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Research Projects

Project Write

Funding: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (R01AA023495)

This project investigates the potential utility of writing about drinking experiences and emotions as a means of reducing future unwanted negative drinking experiences.

Contributors:

PI: Clayton Neighbors, PhD
Co-I: Lindsey Rodriguez, PhD
Co-I Qian Lu, PhD
Lab Manager: Ajaz Shah, MBA
Postdoc: Chelsie Young, PhD
Grad RA: Jordanna Lembo, BA
Staff: Nic Crist, BA 


Social Norms and Alcohol Prevention
(Project SNAP)

Funding: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (R01AA014576)

SNAP is a 5-year NIH-funded study designed to examine alcohol beliefs and attitudes, social identity, and drinking behaviors among college students. In this research project, we are interested in examining students’ perceptions of other students’ drinking behaviors, and how these perceptions affect their own drinking behavior. We are in the final year of this study and in the process of disseminating data and submitting a competing renewal.

Contributors:

PI: Clayton Neighbors, PhD
Staff: Dipali Rinker, PhD
Grad RA: Amber Anthenien, MS


Project CHAMP

Funding: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (R21AA022369)

This project investigates the effectiveness of interventions remotely or in-person and the effectiveness of interventions when incentives are offered or not offered.

Contributors:

PI: Clayton Neighbors, PhD
Co-I: Lindsey Rodriguez, PhD
Lab Manager: Ajaz Shah, MBA
Grad RAs: Lorra Garey, MA
Mary Tomkins, MS
Staff: Maigen Pham, MS


Problem Gambling among Asian/Asian-American/Pacific Islander (AAPI) College Students (Project Luck)

Funding: National Center for Responsible Gaming Seed Grant

Project Luck is a one-year pilot study designed to lay the groundwork for a program of research focused on the development and piloting of culturally-specific screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) to address disordered gambling among college students, with a focus on elucidating culturally-specific mechanisms of gambling behavior change and reducing potential health disparities in seeking and receiving treatment. Specifically, the goals of this research are to focus on disordered gambling among Asian/Asian-American college students. The specific aims of this research include: 1) identifying specific distinctions in gambling behaviors, attitudes, beliefs, family history, and perceived norms between Asian/Asian-American and non-Hispanic Caucasian college students, 2) examining differences in gambling attitudes, beliefs, family history, and perceived norms across five Asian nationalities, 3) examining acculturation as a moderator of associations between gambling attitudes and perceived norms and problem gambling, and 4) comparing the social network structures of Asians/Asian-American and non-Hispanic Caucasian college gamblers. Online data collection has just begun this semester.

PI: Dipali Rinker


REGIONS-C

Research on the Effectiveness of a Gambling Intervention on a National Sample in College (REGIONS-C) is a randomized trial examining the effectiveness of personal normative feedback on reducing gambling behaviors in at risk college gamblers. Funding for this research is provided by the National Center for Responsible Gaming. The project is conducted in conjunction with http://www.collegegambling.org/ and will help provide a national database of normative gambling information which will be used to provide feedback to individuals interested in their own gambling behaviors. Recruitment for the study is ongoing.

Contributors:

PI: Clayton Neighbors, PhD
Co-Is: Jennifer Tacket, PhD, Lindsey Rodriguez, PhD, Dipali Rinker, PhD
Lab Manager: Ajaz Shah, MBA
Grad RA: Heather Krieger, MA
Staff: Nisha Quraishi, BA 


Social Networks and Health

Problems, which result from alcohol consumption, poor diet, exercise, and sleep patterns can produce a wide range of physical and emotional consequences. The broad objective of this research project is to evaluate how social network position influences alcohol use and health behaviors, attitudes, and experienced negative emotional and physical outcomes in Greek Life students. The achievement of this goal will be accomplished by analyzing the complex associations between attitudes, behaviors, and outcomes, strength of network affiliations, and network location to test the validity of more comprehensive relationships including network characteristics, and provide new insights to the associations between these behaviors to be used in future health interventions. This project is funded by a NIF training grant.

Contributors:

PI: Heather Krieger, MA
Sponsor: Clayton Neighbors, PhD
Committee: Mary Larimer, PhD and Kayo Fujimoto, PhD


Marijuana Outcomes Study Team (MOST)

The Marijuana Outcomes Study Team (MOST) is a collective of scientists in the behavioral sciences with a shared vision of answering meaningful research questions regarding marijuana use that have important policy, prevention, and/or treatment implications. This multisite study was initiated by Matthew Pearson at the University of New Mexico, and is currently collecting data at 11 universities across the United States.

Contributors:

PI: Matthew Pearson, PhD
Co PI: Clayton Neighbors, PhD
Grad RA: Amber Anthenien, MS