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Fall 2021 Courses



Find information about upper-level undergraduate and graduate courses within the Philosophy Department on this page.

Upper-Level Undergraduate Courses

PHIL 3304: History of 17Th Century Phil (Class #26702)

Prof Hattab
Regular TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM, Room: TBD

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The main goal of this course is to understand and critically examine the philosophical origins of what is traditionally known as the early modern period in Philosophy. To this end we begin with an overview of the Scholastic Aristotelian philosophy that prevailed in Europe from the middle ages into the modern period. Against this background, we will study the works of philosophers who spearheaded the scientific and philosophical developments of the early seventeenth century, most notably, Francis Bacon, Galileo Galilei and René Descartes.  We will pay special attention to their distinct contributions to scientific method before examining Descartes’ attempt in his Meditations to ground the new science in a new metaphysics and epistemology.  Next we will consider various responses to Descartes’ philosophy, including the criticisms of Princess Elizabeth, the controversial results of Benedict de Spinoza’s application of the geometrical method to all of philosophy in the Ethics, and the more empirically oriented philosophies of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke.  Once we have familiarized ourselves with the foundations of these philosophical systems, we will examine their implications for conceptions of human nature and the good life.


PHIL 3321: Logic III (Class #26700)

Prof. Garson
TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM, Room: S115

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No further information is available at this time.


PHIL 3335: Theory of Knowledge (Class #26698)

Prof. Oliveira
TuTh 8:30AM - 10:00AM, Room: AH 302

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No further information is available at this time.


PHIL 3344: Philosophy of Science (Class #26699)

Oliveira
TuTh 10:00AM - 11:30AM, Room: TBD

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No further information is available at this time.


PHIL 3354: Medical Ethics (Class #20912)

Theresa Hickey
TuTh 8:30AM - 10:00AM, Room: S 202

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No further information is available at this time.


PHIL 3358: Classics in Hist of Ethics (Class #18520)

Prof. Morrison
MoWeFr 9:00AM - 10:00AM, Room: L 212L

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No further information is available at this time.


PHIL 3375: Law, Society, & Morality (Class #21718)

Dr. Babb
TuTh 4:00PM - 5:30PM, Room: TBD

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No further information is available at this time.


PHIL 3383: Law, Society, & Morality (Class #26707)

Prof. Yau
MoWe 2:30PM - 4:00PM, Room: AH 202

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No further information is available at this time.


PHIL 3395: Philosophy of Horror (Class #21718)

Dr. Mag Uidhir
We 4:00PM - 7:00PM, Room: AH 302

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Students should acquire from this course a solid understanding of the principal issues in contemporary Philosophy of Horror. We will begin the course by reading Noel Carroll’s seminal work Philosophy of Horror, or Paradoxes of the Heart. In doing this, we will cover several foundational issues such as the nature of horror—understanding it definitionally, the metaphysics of horror with respect to our engagement with it, as well as why we as consumers find ourselves attracted to works within the horror genre. Other issues we will grapple with include: horror and humor, horror and sound, horror and emotion, and horror and morality. To explore these issues fully each class shall feature a screening of a horror film in addition to lecture/discussion.


Graduate Courses

PHIL 6395: Metaethics (Class #26646)

Prof. Phillips
Mo 4:00PM - 7:00PM, Room: TBD

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This Seminar will divide into two halves. In the first half of the semester we will examine seminal 20th century versions of four main views in metaethics: non-naturalism, naturalism, non-cognitivism, and error theory. The latter part of the survey will be organized around responses to two influential challenges from the1970s: John Mackie’s defense of error theory and Bernard Williams’s development of internalism about reasons. In the second half of the seminar we will read two recent articulations of contrasting views in metaethics: Tim Scanlon’s defense of non-naturalism in Being Realistic About Reasons and Jonas Olson’s defense of error theory in Moral Error Theory: History, Critique, Defense.


PHIL 6395: Seminar in Philosophical Problems (Class #26712)

Prof. Loewenstein
Tu 2:30PM - 4:00PM, Room: TBD

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No further information is available at this time.


PHIL 6395: Seminar in Philosophical Problems (Class #26713)

Prof. Coates
Th 2:30PM - 5:30PM, Room: TBD

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No further information is available at this time.