Faculty and Staff

Philip A Howard
Associate Professor

Philip Howard
  • Phone: (713) 743-3105
  • Email: pahoward@uh.edu
  • Office: 535 Agnes Arnold Hall

Dr. Howard is a scholar of Latin American and Caribbean History. Howard’s research has focused on Afro-Cuban and African influence in Latin America and the Caribbean. He received his Ph.D. from Indiana University, Bloomington. Dr. Howard has done research in Spain and Cuba and was the recipient of a research award from The Center for Latin American Studies. He has also served as the panel chair and commentator at conference sessions regarding labor systems and social structures in Cuba and literacy in slave societies.

Teaching

Dr. Howard’s undergraduate courses include Latin America 1492-1820; African Experience in Latin America and the Caribbean. He also teaches a graduate course titled Spain in America.

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Research Interests

Dr. Howard’s first book is titled Changing History: The Afro-Cuban Cabildos and Societies of Color in the nineteenth Century (LSU Press, 1998). This book uses historical and anthropological approaches to comparative slavery, emancipation, and race relations and the African diaspora in Latin America and the Caribbean, particularly Cuba. He is currently researching Jamaican and Haitian labor in the Cuban sugar industry.

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Selected Publications

  • Changing History: The Afro-Cuban Cabildos and Societies of Color in the nineteenth Century (LSU Press, 1998).
  • “La lucha por justicia económica y social: las experiencias de los jamaicanos i hatianos en la Cuba azucarera 1919-1930, for Untitled edited volume on the Cuban Labor Movement, published by the Instituto de Historia de Cuba, fall 2005.
  • “Interpreting the Experiences of the African Diaspora in the Americas.” Vanderbilt University E-Journal of Luso-Hispanic Studies, no.1, fall 2003.
  • Creolization and Integration: The Development of a Political Culture among the Pan-Afro-Cuban Benevolent Societies, 1878-1895.” In Darlene Clark-Hine, ed. Crossing Boundaries: The History of Black People in Diaspora (Indiana University Press, 1999).