Fall 2014 Courses

Find information about upper-level undergraduate and graduate courses within the Philosophy Department on this page.

Upper-Level Undergraduate Courses

PHIL 3304: History of 17th Century Phil (Class #10200)

Prof. Hattab
TuTh 10:00AM - 11:30AM, Room: D3 E323

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No further information is available at this time.

PHIL 3321: Modal Logic (Logic III) (Class #22563)

Prof. Garson
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM, Room: M 113

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Modal logics are systems designed to handle concepts of necessity and possibility. They are close cousins to logics of obligation, belief, knowledge and time, which are often included in the modal logic family. The course will develop a variety of these logics, illustrating their applications and some of the related philosophical issues. A main concern will be the development of possible worlds semantics and the demonstration of soundness and completeness for the logics studied. The course is based on my book Modal Logic for Philosophers, 2nd Edition. Completion of exercises is the centerpiece of learning the material, so exercises will be assigned for almost every class meeting. There will also be a midterm, two short “pop” quizzes, one before and one after the midterm, and a final..

PHIL 3349: Philosophy of Social Sciences (Class #22568)

Prof. Weisberg
02:30 - 04:00 MW, Room: AH 10

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No further information is available at this time..

PHIL 3350: Ethics (Class #21185)

Prof. Coates
TuTh 8:30AM - 10:00AM, Room: M 111

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No further information is available at this time.

PHIL 3358: Contemporary Moral Issues (Class #22573)

Prof. Phillips
TuTh 4:00PM - 5:30PM, Room: M 102

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Philosophical analysis of contemporary issues such as abortion, affirmative action, the treatment of animals, capital punishment, euthanasia, and famine relief.

PHIL 3358: Classics in the History of Ethics (Class #22566)

Prof. Morrison
MoWeFr 9:00AM - 10:00AM, Room: L 212L

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No further information is available at this time.

PHIL 3383: History of Ancient Philosophy (Class #20773)

Prof. Freeland
online

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No further information is available at this time.

PHIL 3395: Philosophy of Film (Class #22571)

Prof. Mag Uidhir
Mo 4:00PM - 7:00PM, Room: AH 302

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The aim of this course is to provide a solid understanding of the principal issues in contemporary analytic philosophy of film as well as how these issues intersect with a variety of disciplines outside of philosophy (e.g., film studies, art history, psychology and cognitive science). The course will begin by focusing on defining cinema itself as well as its relation to other visually depictive media. The remainder of the course will address issues surrounding the puzzles of narrative-engagement. To best facilitate student understanding of these issues, the following films will be screened in class: October (1927), Un Chien Andalou (1929), La Jetée (1962), Scorpio Rising (1964), Wavelength (1967), Suspiria(1977), The Thin Blue Line (1988), Spoorloos (1988), & Irreversible (2004).

Graduate Courses

PHIL 6304: History of 17th Century Phil (Class #10202)

Prof. Hattab
TuTh 10:00AM - 11:30AM, Room: D3 E323

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No further information is available at this time.

PHIL 6321: Modal Logic (Class #22583)

Prof. Garson
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM, Room: M 113

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Modal logics are systems designed to handle concepts of necessity and possibility. They are close cousins to logics of obligation, belief, knowledge and time, which are often included in the modal logic family. The course will develop a variety of these logics, illustrating their applications and some of the related philosophical issues. A main concern will be the development of possible worlds semantics and the demonstration of soundness and completeness for the logics studied. The course is based on my book Modal Logic for Philosophers, 2nd Edition. Completion of exercises is the centerpiece of learning the material, so exercises will be assigned for almost every class meeting. There will also be a midterm, two short “pop” quizzes, one before and one after the midterm, and a final..

PHIL 6322: Logic and Philosophy (Class #12655)

Prof. Buckner
MoWe 1:00PM - 2:30PM, Room: AH 512

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     This course is an introduction to the application of logic to philosophy. It provides an accelerated background in predicate logic sufficient for navigating the philosophical literature, and serves as a graduate level introduction to the philosophy of logic.

     The first half of the course will be concerned primarily with predicate logic: translation of English argumentation into predicate logic notation, proofs and trees for checking validity, and discussion of some metalogical features such as soundness, completeness, and the lack of a decision procedure.

     The second half will explore applications of predicate logic to a number of philosophical issues, including the theory of descriptions, the paradoxes of material implication, the integration of logical and probabilistic reasoning, causation, and default reasoning. We will explore these issues by devising solutions in logic programming languages to philosophical puzzles like the frame problem, Simpson’s Paradox, and the Monty Hall Problem.

PHIL 6350: Ethics (Class #22584)

Prof. Coates
TuTh 8:30AM - 10:00AM, Room: M 111

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No further information is available at this time.

PHIL 6358: Classics in the History of Ethics (Class #22585)

Prof. Morrison
MoWeFr 9:00AM - 10:00AM, Room: L 212L

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No further information is available at this time.

PHIL 6383: History of Ancient Philosophy (Class #20775)

Prof. Freeland
online

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No further information is available at this time.

PHIL 6395: Honor (Class #22590)

Prof. Sommers
Tu 2:30PM - 5:30PM, Room: AH 512

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No further information is available at this time.

PHIL 6395: The Hume/Quine Revolution (Class #22592)

Prof. Johnsen
We 4:00PM - 7:00PM, Room: AH 512

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No further information is available at this time.

PHIL 6396: Locke and Leibniz (Class #22595)

Prof. Brown
Th 2:30PM - 5:30PM, Room: AH 512

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No further information is available at this time.

PHIL 6397: Philosophy of Social Sciences (Class #22586)

Prof. Weisberg
02:30 - 04:00 MW, Room: AH 10

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No further information is available at this time..

PHIL 6397: Philosophy of Film (Class #22587)

Prof. Mag Uidhir
Mo 4:00PM - 7:00PM, Room: AH 302

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The aim of this course is to provide a solid understanding of the principal issues in contemporary analytic philosophy of film as well as how these issues intersect with a variety of disciplines outside of philosophy (e.g., film studies, art history, psychology and cognitive science). The course will begin by focusing on defining cinema itself as well as its relation to other visually depictive media. The remainder of the course will address issues surrounding the puzzles of narrative-engagement. To best facilitate student understanding of these issues, the following films will be screened in class: October (1927), Un Chien Andalou (1929), La Jetée (1962), Scorpio Rising (1964), Wavelength (1967), Suspiria(1977), The Thin Blue Line (1988), Spoorloos (1988), & Irreversible (2004).