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Fall 2017 Courses

Find information about upper-level undergraduate and graduate courses within the Philosophy Department on this page.

Upper-Level Undergraduate Courses

PHIL 3305: History of 18th Century Philosophy (Class #22941)

Prof Morrisson
MoWeFr 9:00AM - 10:00AM, Room: L 212L

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In this class I will ask the broad philosophical question: Who is Enlightenment man? More specifically, how do we understand the 18th century vision of humans in their social, political, ethical, and epistemological relations with the world? We will read essays from Hume, Rousseau, and Kant in an effort to answer this question. Three different visions emerge which have relevance to how we understand ourselves now 250 years later.


PHIL 3321: Logic III (Class #22937)

Prof. Garson
TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM, Room: AH 302

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Modal logics are systems designed to handle concepts of necessity and possibility. They are close cousins to logics of obligation, belief, knowledge and time, which are often included in the modal logic family. The course will develop a variety of these logics, illustrating their applications and some of the related philosophical issues. A main concern will be the development of possible worlds semantics and the demonstration of soundness and completeness for the logics studied. There will be weekly exercises, completion of which is crucial for success in the course. There will be a midterm, two short unannounced “pop” quizzes, one before and one after the midterm, and a final.


PHIL 3333: Metaphysics (Class #26727)

Staff
TuTh 10:00AM - 11:30AM, Room: AH 202

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No further information is available at this time.


PHIL 3349: Philosophy of Social Sciences (Class #22940)

Prof. Weisberg
MoWe 1:00PM - 2:30PM Room: AH 9

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No further information is available at this time.


PHIL 3354: Medical Ethics (Class #22620)

Staff
MoWe 2:30PM - 4:00PM, Room: TBA

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No further information is available at this time.


PHIL 3355: Political Philosophy (Class #22945)

Prof. Sommers
MoWe 4:00PM - 5:30PM, Room: H 32

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This course examines a wide range of political thought since Plato, with a special focus on questions concerning the “open society.”  Open societies and liberal democracies are celebrated for its protection of the dignity and liberty of the individual.  But can societies have an excess of freedom, as Plato argued in The Republic?   Can some degree of social control be justified if it leads to greater harmony and happiness among the populace?  Are citizens in democracies sufficiently well-informed and well-educated to govern their lives and their country?   Does the individualist ethic promoted in a free market democracy lead to stark inequalities, alienation, or demoralization?  Is there a single best form of government for all human beings, or are some political systems suitable for some cultures but not others?   This course will explore these questions and others from a variety of historical, cultural, and literary perspectives.  

 Readings include Huxley’s Brave New World, Plato’s Republic, Marx’s “Communist Manifesto,” Popper’s The Open Society and Its Enemies, Berlin’s “Two Concepts of Liberty,” and Fukuyama’s “The End of History.”.


PHIL 3358: Classics in the History of Ethics (Class #18934)

Prof. Phillips
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM, Room: AH 2

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No further information is available at this time.


Graduate Courses

PHIL 6305: History of 18th Century Philosophy (Class #22939)

Prof. Morrisson
MoWeFr 9:00AM - 10:00AM, Room: L 212L

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In this class I will ask the broad philosophical question: Who is Enlightenment man? More specifically, how do we understand the 18th century vision of humans in their social, political, ethical, and epistemological relations with the world? We will read essays from Hume, Rousseau, and Kant in an effort to answer this question. Three different visions emerge which have relevance to how we understand ourselves now 250 years later.


PHIL 6321: Modal Logic (Class #22938)

Prof. Garson
TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM, Room: AH 302

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Modal logics are systems designed to handle concepts of necessity and possibility. They are close cousins to logics of obligation, belief, knowledge and time, which are often included in the modal logic family. The course will develop a variety of these logics, illustrating their applications and some of the related philosophical issues. A main concern will be the development of possible worlds semantics and the demonstration of soundness and completeness for the logics studied. There will be weekly exercises, completion of which is crucial for success in the course. There will be a midterm, two short unannounced “pop” quizzes, one before and one after the midterm, and a final.


PHIL 6333: Metaphysics (Class #26730)

Staff
TuTh 10:00AM - 11:30AM, Room: AH 202

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No further information is available at this time.


PHIL 6358: Classics in the History of Ethics (Class #18935)

Prof. Phillips
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM, Room: AH 2

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No further information is available at this time.


PHIL 6395: Logic and Meaning (Class #22943)

Prof. Garson
Th 2:30PM - 5:30PM, Room: AH 512

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The course considers the interactions between formal logic, the analysis of language and related issues in philosophy. The main topic will be inferentialism, the thesis that the meaning of an expression is defined by the deductive relationships it determines. A central concern will be the objection that inferential relations are too weak to fix meanings that we intuitively assign. In particular, we will examine the degree to which an inferentialist account of the meanings of the logical connectives is a viable one, and apply the lessons learned there to meaning in general. This investigation will reveal the existence of alternative interpretations of the logical connectives and will apply them to the analysis of such philosophical problems as future contingency, ontological commitment, and vagueness. The course will be organized around my book:  What Logics Mean (Cambridge 2013). If we have time, we may also take a look at chapters from a book I am writing called At. Here I show how a logic for the modest preposition 'at' helps resolve puzzles about meaning and time.


PHIL 6395: Seminar Philosophical Problems (Class #22944)

Prof. Coates
We 2:30PM - 5:30PM, Room: AH 512

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No further information is available at this time.


PHIL 6395: Epistemic Normativity (Class #26726)

Prof. Oliveira
Mo 2:30PM - 5:30PM, Room: AH 512

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This class will examine contemporary views on the nature and source of epistemicv alues, reasons, and norms. In particular, we will discuss the value of knowledge and truth, the distinction between teleological and non-teleological epistemic norms, and the plausibility of epistemic instrumentalism. All readings will be made available as pdfs.


PHIL 6397: Philosophy of Social Science (Class #22942)

Prof. Weisberg
MoWe 1:00PM - 2:30PM, Room: AH 9

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No further information is available at this time.