Health and Human Performance
The University of Houston
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Dr. Clarke's Research Results in Launch of New Startup For Process to Grow Human Bone.

HHP faculty Dr. Mark Clarke's research has resulted in a process that grows real human bone in tissue culture, which can be used to investigate how bones form and grow. 

 "We have manufactured a structure that has no synthetic components," said Mark Clarke, associate professor and principal investigator.  "It's all made by the two cell types bones start with inside the body.  What you end up with is a piece of material that is identical to newly-formed, human, trabecular bone, including its mineral components, its histology and its growth factor content." 

The technology has now been licensed to Dr. Clarke's newly formed start-up company, OsteoSphere Inc., which will examine ways the breakthrough research can be used in a clinical setting for applications such as spinal fusions, facial reconstructions following bomb blasts or the re-growing of an individual bone outside of the patient.

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Dr. Mark Clarke

The University of Houston issued a press release about the tie-up. Below is an excerpt from the release:

Clarke has worked with NASA on other bone loss studies.  He served as a principal investigator in a NASA study of micro-fabricated skin patches that collect sweat for analysis of biomarkers of bone loss, like calcium.   

His research on bone formation also is proving to be market-ready, as a newly formed start-up company, OsteoSphere Inc., examines ways the breakthrough research can be used in a clinical setting for applications such as spinal fusions, facial reconstructions following bomb blasts or the re-growing of an individual bone outside of the patient.

"UH has now licensed the technology to OsteoSphere Inc. which is looking at ways to commercialize the technology in a clinical setting, including culturing an individual's own bone for subsequent transplantation back into the patient, developing other products for use in orthopedic reconstruction or using the technology as a screening tool for development of pharmaceuticals for combating bone loss or stimulating bone regeneration," Clarke said. 

Read the entire article on the UH website