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Recent Events

Poison Pen Reading Series featuring Rodrigo Hasbun, Kaj Tanaka, Paige Quiñones
Thursday, August 30, 8:30 pm
(Poison Girl, 1641 Westheimer Rd)
Founded and currently organized by UH Creative Writing students and alumni, Poison Pen was voted Houston’s Best Reading Series in 2014 by the Houston Press. Poison Pen brings in three readers on the last Thursday of each month. Poison Pen’s readers are locally and nationally recognizable writers of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction

Luisa Muradyan reads from American Radiance
Tuesday, September 4, 7pm
(Brazos Bookstore, 2421 Bissonnet Street)
A debut poetry collection from the former editor of Houston’s own Gulf Coast. AMERICAN RADIANCE reflects on the author’s experience immigrating as a child to the United States from Ukraine in 1991. Colliding with the grand figures of late ‘80s and early ‘90s pop culture, Muradyan’s imagination pushes the reader forward, confronting the painful loss of identity that assimilation brings.

Eoin Colfer reads from Illegal
Monday, September 10, 7pm
(Brazos Bookstore, 2421 Bissonnet Street)
A powerfully moving graphic novel by New York Times bestselling author Eoin Colfer and the team behind the Artemis Fowl graphic novels that explores the current plight of undocumented immigrants.

Randy Kennedy reads from Presidio
Tuesday, September 11, 7pm
(Brazos Bookstore, 2421 Bissonnet Street)
Set in the 1970s in the vast and arid landscape of the Texas panhandle, this darkly comic and stunningly mature literary debut tells the story of a car thief and his brother who set out to recover some stolen money and inadvertently kidnap a Mennonite girl who has her own reasons for being on the run.

Sarah Bird reads from Daughter of a Daughter of a Queen
Wednesday, September 12, 7pm
(Brazos Bookstore, 2421 Bissonnet Street)
One of the great Texas authors returns with a new book! Powerful, epic, and compelling, DAUGHTER OF A DAUGHTER OF A QUEEN shines light on a nearly forgotten figure in history. The compelling, hidden story of Cathy Williams, a former slave and the only woman to ever serve with the legendary Buffalo Soldiers.

De Ray Mckesson reads from On the Other Side of Freedom
Friday, September 14, 7:30 pm
Presented offsite at the Ballroom at Bayou Place
Join DeRay Mckesson, the internationally recognized civil rights leader and host of the podcast Pod Save the People, for a timely conversation on culture, social justice, and politics. Drawing from his own experiences as an organizer, educator, and public official, Mckesson will explore the issues of the day and discuss the subtle structures and inherent biases that impact our communities.

This is a ticketed event.

Guadalupe Nettel reads from After the Winter
Tuesday, September 18, 7pm
(Brazos Bookstore, 2421 Bissonnet Street)
In 2006, Guadalupe Nettel was voted one of the thirty-nine most important Latin American writers under the age of thirty-nine at the Bogotá Hay Festival. In parallel and entwining stories that move from Havana to Paris to New York City, AFTER THE WINTER describes how no routine, no argument for the pleasures of solitude, can withstand our most human drive to find ourselves in another, and fall in love.

Poetry & Prose:New UH Creative Writing Graduate Students 
Wednesday, September 19, 5:30 pm
(MD Anderson Library, Honors Commons, UH Campus)
Poetry & Prose is a reading series featuring UH faculty, students, alumni and other well-known writers, that happens right here on campus.
Readings are free and open to the public. Light refreshments are served.

The series is presented by the University of Houston Libraries, in cooperation with the University of Houston Creative Writing Program.

Gulf Coast Reading Series featuring Lacy M. Johnson
Friday, September 21, 7pm
(Lawndale Art Center, 4912 S Main St,)
The Gulf Coast reading series presents the poetry and prose of UH graduate students, paired with prominent featured visiting writers, at Lawndale Art Center. Participating students come from the MFA and PhD programs in Creative Writing. 

Jose Antonio Vargas reads from Dear America
Monday, September 24, 7pm
(Brazos Bookstore, In partnership with Nuestra Palabra: Latino Writers Having Their Say and the Mayor’s Hispanic Advisory Board Art Committee

Presented offsite at Talento Bilingüe de Houston)
Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas, called “the most famous undocumented immigrant in America,” tackles one of the defining issues of our time in this explosive and deeply personal call to arms.

This is a ticketed event.

Inprint Margarett Root Brown Reading Series featuring Esi Edugyan & Meg Wolitzer
Monday, September 24, 7:30 pm 
(Cullen Performance Hall, University of Houston, 4300 University Drive)
Esi Edugyan’s breakthrough second novel Half-Blood Blues won the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, and was a finalist for the Man Booker Prize and an O Magazine Best Book of the Year. Edugyan’s other works include the novel The Second Life of Samuel Tyne, shortlisted for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and the nonfiction book Dreaming of Elsewhere: Observations on Home.

“Meg Wolitzer is the novelist we need right now,” says The Washington Post. Her bestselling novel The Female Persuasion was named one of the most anticipated books of 2018 by Time, New York magazine, Entertainment Weeklyand elsewhere. She is also the author of novels for children and young adults. In 2017 she served as guest editor of Best American Short Stories, and three films have been based on her books: This Is My Life, directed by Nora Ephron; Surrender, Dorothy; and The Wife, with Glenn Close.

Reading followed by an on-stage interview – conducted by former Houston Poet Laureate/UH-Downtown faculty member Robin Davidson – plus a book sale and signing.

Glass Mountain Reading 
Tuesday, September 25, 7pm
(Bohemeo’s, 708 Telephone Rd)
Glass Mountain is a national undergraduate literary magazine run by undergraduates at UH. reading will feature guest writers (fiction, poetry, nonfiction) with an open mic to follow. The open mic is open to all. Cake will be provided.

Poison Pen Reading Series
Thursday, September 27, 8:30 pm
(Poison Girl, 1641 Westheimer Rd)
Founded and currently organized by UH Creative Writing students and alumni, Poison Pen was voted Houston’s Best Reading Series in 2014 by the Houston Press. Poison Pen brings in three readers on the last Thursday of each month. Poison Pen’s readers are locally and nationally recognizable writers of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.

Poison Pen Reading Series featuring Bryan Washington, Adrian Blevins, Travis Mossotti
Thursday, September 27, 8:30 pm
(Poison Girl, 1641 Westheimer Rd)
Founded and currently organized by UH Creative Writing students and alumni, Poison Pen was voted Houston’s Best Reading Series in 2014 by the Houston Press. Poison Pen brings in three readers on the last Thursday of each month. Poison Pen’s readers are locally and nationally recognizable writers of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.

Henk Rossouw reads from Xamissa
Friday, September 28, 7pm
(Brazos Bookstore, 2421 Bissonnet Street)
A debut poetry collection from the former editor of Houston’s own Gulf Coast. AMERICAN RADIANCE reflects on the author’s experience immigrating as a child to the United States from Ukraine in 1991. Colliding with the grand figures of late ‘80s and early ‘90s pop culture, Muradyan’s imagination pushes the reader forward, confronting the painful loss of identity that assimilation brings.

An Evening with Dorothy Project: Cristina Rivera Garza & Sabrina Orah Mark
Monday, October 1, 7pm
(Brazos Bookstore, 2421 Bissonnet Street)
A fairy tale run amok, The Taiga Syndrome follows an unnamed female Ex-Detective as she searches for a couple who has fled to the far reaches of the earth. A betrayed husband is convinced by a brief telegram that his second ex-wife wants him to track her down—that she wants to be found. He hires the Ex-Detective, who sets out with a translator into a snowy, hostile forest where strange things happen and translation betrays both sense and one’s senses. Tales of Hansel and Gretel and Little Red Riding Hood haunt the Ex-Detective’s quest, though the lessons of her journey are more experiential than moral: that just as love can fly away, sometimes unloving flies away as well. That sometimes leaving everything behind is the only thing left to do.

Wild Milk is like Borscht Belt meets Leonora Carrington; it’s like Donald Barthelme meets Pony Head; it’s like the Brothers Grimm meet Beckett in his swim trunks at the beach. In other words, this remarkable collection of stories is unlike anything you’ve read.

Ben Fountain reads from Beautiful Country Burn Again
Thursday, October 4, 7pm
(Brazos Bookstore, 2421 Bissonnet Street)
Beautiful Country Burn Again narrates a shocking year in American politics, moving from the early days of the Iowa Caucus to the crystalizing moments of the Democratic and Republican national conventions, and culminating in the aftershocks of the weeks following election night. Along the way, Fountain probes deeply into history, illuminating the forces and watershed moments of the past that mirror and precipitated the present, from the hollowed-out notion of the American Dream, to Richard Nixon’s southern strategy, to our weaponized new conception of American exceptionalism, to the cult of celebrity that gave rise to Donald Trump.

Alan Lightman reads from Searching for Stars on an Island in Maine
Friday, October 5, 7pm
(Brazos Bookstore, 2421 Bissonnet Street)
Alan Lightman—who worked for many years as a theoretical physicist—is the author of six novels, including the international best seller Einstein’s Dreams, as well as The Diagnosis, a finalist for the National Book Award. He is also the author of a memoir, three collections of essays, and several books on science. His work has appeared in The Atlantic, Granta, Harper’s Magazine, The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, Salon, and Nature, among other publications. He has taught at Harvard and at MIT, where he was the first person to receive a dual faculty appointment in science and the humanities. He is currently professor of the practice of the humanities at MIT. He lives in the Boston area.

Lacy Johnson reads from The Reckonings
Tuesday, October 9, 7pm
(Brazos Bookstore, 2421 Bissonnet Street)
From “Speak Truth to Power,” about the condition of not being believed about rape and assault; to “Goliath,” about the concept of evil; to “Girlhood in a Semi-Barbarous Age,” about the sacred feminine, “ideal woman,” and feminist art, Johnson creates masterful, elaborate, gorgeously written essays that speak incisively about our current era. She grapples with justice and retribution, truth and fairness, and sexual assault and workplace harassment, as well as the broadest societal wrongs: the BP Oil Spill, government malfeasance, police killings. The Reckonings is a powerful and necessary work, ambitious in its scope, which strikes at the heart of our national conversation about the justness of society.

Gulf Coast presents An Evening with Three Irish Poets
Monday, October 15, 6:30 pm
(Archway Gallery. 2305 Dunlavy St.)
In partnership with Copper Nickel and Culture Ireland, Gulf Coast Journal presents three Irish poets reading new work. Conor O'Callaghan, Elaine Feeney, and Jessica Traynor – highly-regarded poets with an international reputation – are traveling from Ireland to read their work all across the U.S., and Houston is their first stop! 

Poetry & Prose 
Wednesday, October 17, 5:30 pm
(MD Anderson Library, Honors Commons, UH Campus)
Poetry & Prose is a reading series featuring UH faculty, students, alumni and other well-known writers, that happens right here on campus.
Readings are free and open to the public. Light refreshments are served.

The series is presented by the University of Houston Libraries, in cooperation with the University of Houston Creative Writing Program.  

A Reading with Ange Mlinko
Thursday, October 18, 7pm
(Lawndale Art Center, 4912 S Main St,)
Guggenheim Fellow Ange Mlinko is the author of five books of poetry: Distant Mandate (2017); Marvelous Things Overheard (2013), which was selected by both the New Yorker and the Boston Globe as a best book of 2013; Shoulder Season (2010), a finalist for the William Carlos Williams Award; Starred Wire (2005), which was a National Poetry Series winner in 2004 and a finalist for the James Laughlin Award; and Matinees (1999). She taught for several years at the University of Houston's Creative Writing Program, and now lives in Florida, where she is Professor of English at the University of Florida.
 
Easy parking! Free wine and snacks! 

Gulf Coast Reading Series featuring Jamel Brinkley
Friday, October 19, 7pm
(Lawndale Art Center, 4912 S Main St,)
The Gulf Coast reading series presents the poetry and prose of UH graduate students, paired with prominent featured visiting writers, at Lawndale Art Center. Participating students come from the MFA and PhD programs in Creative Writing.

Anne Lamott reads from Almost Everything
Friday, October 19, 7pm
(St. Paul’s Methodist United Church, 5501 S. Main St)
This is a ticketed event. Doors open at 6:30pm.

In this profound and funny book, Lamott calls for each of us to rediscover the nuggets of hope and wisdom that are buried within us that can make life sweeter than we ever imagined. Divided into short chapters that explore life’s essential truths, Almost Everything pinpoints these moments of insight as it shines an encouraging light forward. 
Anne Lamott is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Hallelujah AnywaySmall VictoriesStitchesHelp, Thanks, WowSome Assembly RequiredGrace (Eventually)Plan BBird by Bird; and Traveling Mercies, as well as several novels, including Imperfect Birds and Rosie. She is a past recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and an inductee to the California Hall of Fame.

Inprint Margarett Root Brown Reading Series featuring Barbara Kingsolver
Monday, October 22, 7:30 pm 
(Cullen Performance Hall, University of Houston, 4300 University Drive)
Barbara Kingslover is “a gifted magician of words,” according to Time, and “a writer of rare ambition and unequivocal talent,” writes the Chicago Tribune. With a literary career that has spanned three decades and encompassed award-winning works of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction, Kingsolver’s work touches on vital themes of social justice and the environment. Her bestselling novel The Poisonwood Bible won the National Book Prize of South Africa, was chosen for Oprah’s Book Club, and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, the Orange Prize, and the PEN/Faulkner Award. Her novel Flight Behavior was named a “Best Book of the Year” by the Washington Post and USA Today. Her nonfiction New York Times bestseller Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life won the James Beard Award and was praised by the Washington Post Book World as “charming, zestful, funny and poetic… a serious book about important problems.” Kingsolver, a recipient of the National Humanities Medal, the Dayton Literary Peace Prize and founder of the PEN/Bellwether Prize, has been widely anthologized, and her works are translated into more than 25 languages. She will read from her new novel, Unsheltered.

Reading followed by an on-stage interview – conducted by author/former Houston First Lady/member of the Houston Chronicle Editorial Board Andrea White – plus a book sale and signing.

Poison Pen Reading Series featuring Michelle Orsi, Ryan Cal, Jason Koo
Thursday, October 25, 8:30 pm
(Poison Girl, 1641 Westheimer Rd)
Founded and currently organized by UH Creative Writing students and alumni, Poison Pen was voted Houston’s Best Reading Series in 2014 by the Houston Press. Poison Pen brings in three readers on the last Thursday of each month. Poison Pen’s readers are locally and nationally recognizable writers of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.

Walter Mosley reads from John Woman
Thursday, October 25, 7pm
(500 Texas Avenue)
Presented in partnership with the Houston Public Library
This event is free. RSVP is TBA on the Houston Public Library’s website.
Walter Mosley is the author of more than fifty critically-acclaimed books, including the major bestselling mystery series featuring Easy Rawlins. His work has been translated into twenty-five languages and includes literary fiction, science fiction, political monographs, and a young adult novel. In 2013, he was inducted into the New York State Writers Hall of Fame, and he is the winner of numerous awards, including an O. Henry Award, the Mystery Writers of America’s Grand Master Award, a Grammy, and PEN America’s Lifetime Achievement Award. He lives in New York City.
 
Laura van den Berg reads from The Third Hotel
Friday, October 26, 7pm
(Lawndale Arts Center, 4912 S. Main St)
Presented in partnership with Gulf Coast: A Journal of Literature and Fine Arts at the Lawndale Art Center
Laura van den Berg is the author of two story collections, What the World Will Look Like When All the Water Leaves Us and The Isle of Youth, and the novel Find Me. Her fiction has received the Rosenthal Family Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts & Letters, the Bard Fiction Prize, an O. Henry Award, and a MacDowell Colony fellowship. Born and raised in Florida, she lives in Cambridge, MA, with her husband and dog.

Glass Mountain Reading 
Tuesday, October 30, 7pm
(Bohemeo’s, 708 Telephone Rd)
Glass Mountain is a national undergraduate literary magazine run by undergraduates at UH. reading will feature guest writers (fiction, poetry, nonfiction) with an open mic to follow. The open mic is open to all. Cake will be provided.

Glass Mountain presents Write-a-Thon
Saturday, November 3, 8am – 5pm
(UH Writing Center, CBB 238)
Write-A-Thon is like a marathon, but instead of running, you write, participate in writing-based contests, and Glass Mountain provides lunch and snacks.
 
To participate, grab a sponsor who will pledge money in your name either by the hour or as a set amount. All money raised benefits the Boldface Writers’ Conference.

Joshua Rivkin reads from Chalk: The Art and Erasure of Cy Twombly
Sunday, November 4, 5pm
(Brazos Bookstore, 2421 Bissonnet Street)
Upon first seeing Twombly’s remarkable paintings, author Joshua Rivkin became obsessed himself with the mysterious artist, and began chasing every lead, big or small—anything that might illuminate who Twombly really was. 

Now, after unprecedented archival research and years of interviews, Rivkin has reconstructed Twombly’s life, from his time at the legendary Black Mountain College, to his canonization in a 1979 Whitney retrospective; from his heady explorations of Rome in the 1950s with Robert Rauschenberg, to the ongoing efforts to shape his legacy after his death.

Including previously unpublished photographs, Chalk presents a more personal and searching type of biography than we’ve ever encountered, and brings to life a more complex Twombly than we’ve ever known.

Randall Watson reads from The Geometry of Wishes
Monday, November 5, 7pm
(Brazos Bookstore, 2421 Bissonnet Street)
Randall Watson’s first book, Las Delaciones del Sueño, translated by Antonio Saborit and with a preface by Adam Zagajewski, was published in a bilingual edition by the Universidad Veracruzana in Xalapa, Mexico. His collection The Sleep Accusations received the 2004 Blue Lynx Poetry Award and his novella, Petals, under the heteronym Ellis Reece won the 2006-07 Quarterly West Novella Competition.  He is also the editor of The Weight of Addition, An Anthology of Texas Poetry, published by Mutabilis Press.

Sally Connolly reads from Ranches of Isolation
Saturday, November 10, 7pm
(Brazos Bookstore, 2421 Bissonnet Street)
Sally Connolly is the Graduate Director of the English Department. She is an Associate Professor of Contemporary Poetry and is an authority on American, British and Irish verse from the Modern period to the present day. She previously taught at Wake Forest University and was a Visiting Fellow at Harvard University. Dr. Connolly’s main area of research is the elegiac tradition, and particularly elegies for poets.

Her first book Grief and Meter: Elegies for Poets After Auden was published by the University of Virginia Press in 2016. Her second book Ranches of Isolation: Transatlantic Poetics will be published in 2018 followed by a critical biography of the Anglo-American poet Thom Gunn. Her reviews and articles appear in publications such as Poetry, The Times Literary Supplement, and Yeats Annual. She has been the recipient of several prestigious honors and awards including the Kennedy Scholarship at Harvard University.

Inprint Margarett Root Brown Reading Series featuring Jonathan Lethem & Gary Shteyngart
Monday, November 12, 7:30 pm 
(Cullen Performance Hall, University of Houston, 4300 University Drive)
Jonathan Lethem, a MacArthur “genius” fellow, has been called “one of America’s greatest storytellers” by the Washington Post and “one of our most inventive, stylish and sensuous writers” by Entertainment Weekly. Lethem’s novels include Motherless Brooklyn, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award; The Fortress of Solitude, a New York Times bestseller; and Chronic City, a New York Times Best Book of the Year. He is also the author of several story collections and nonfiction books, including The Ecstasy of Influence, a New York Times Notable Book and a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. He comes to Houston to read from his 11th novel The Feral Detective.

Gary Shteyngart has been hailed by The New York Times as “one of his generation’s most original and exhilarating writers.” His debut novel The Russian Debutante’s Handbook won the Stephen Crane Award and the National Jewish Book Award for Fiction. His other novels include Absurdistan—named one of the 10 Best Books of the Year by The New York Times Book Review and a best book of the year by Time, San Francisco Chronicle, Chicago Tribune, and elsewhere—and Super Sad True Love Story, winner of the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize. His New York Times bestselling memoir Little Failure was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Born in Leningrad in 1972, Shteyngart’s work has been translated into 29 languages. Elizabeth Gilbert writes, about his new novel Lake Success, from which he will read: “This is a novel that seems to have been created in real time, reflecting with perfect comedy and horrible tragedy exactly what America feels like right this minute…. The novel is stupendous.”

Reading followed by an on-stage interview – conducted by novelist/critic/UH Honors College faculty member Robert Cremins – plus a book sale and signing.

Anna Moschovakis reads from Eleanor, or the Rejection of the Progress of Love
Tuesday, November 13, 7pm
(Brazos Bookstore, 2421 Bissonnet Street)
A missing laptop, a petulant critic, a sojourn in communal living—Eleanor, or, The Rejection of the Progress of Love is a bracingly intelligent examination of grief, autonomy, aging, desire, information overload, and the condition of being a thinking and feeling inhabitant of an often unthinkable, numbing world. Anna Moschovakis’s debut novel bristles with honesty, humor, and the hungers that propel us to revise and again revise our lives

Anna Moschovakis’s books include They and We Will Get into Trouble for ThisYou and Three Others Are Approaching a Lake(winner of the James Laughlin Award), and English translations of Albert Cossery’s The Jokers, Annie Ernaux’s The Possession,and Bresson on Bresson. She is a longtime member of the Brooklyn-based publishing collective Ugly Duckling Presse and cofounder of Bushel, a collectively run art and community space in the Catskills. This is her first novel.

Poetry & Prose featuring Robin Davidson + Tony Diaz
Wednesday, November 14, 5:30 pm
(MD Anderson Library, Honors Commons, UH Campus)
Poetry & Prose is a reading series featuring UH faculty, students, alumni and other well-known writers, that happens right here on campus.
Readings are free and open to the public. Light refreshments are served.

The series is presented by the University of Houston Libraries, in cooperation with the University of Houston Creative Writing Program

Gulf Coast Reading Series featuring Hanif Abdurraqib
Friday, November 16, 7pm
(Lawndale Art Center, 4912 S Main St,)
The Gulf Coast reading series presents the poetry and prose of UH graduate students, paired with prominent featured visiting writers, at Lawndale Art Center. Participating students come from the MFA and PhD programs in Creative Writing.

Jessica Wilbanks reads from When I Spoke in Tongues
Saturday, November 17, 7pm
(Brazos Bookstore, 2421 Bissonnet Street)
When I Spoke in Tongues is a story of the painful and complicated process of losing one’s faith and moving across class divides. And in the end, it’s a story of how a family splintered by dogmatic faith can eventually be knit together again through love.

Jessica Wilbanks is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize as well as creative nonfiction awards from Ninth LetterSycamore ReviewRedivider, and Ruminate magazine. In 2014, she was selected as a finalist for the PEN Center USA Literary Award in Journalism. Jessica received her MFA in creative nonfiction from the University of Houston, where she served as nonfiction editor for Gulf Coast. She lives in Houston, Texas with her husband and son.

Poison Pen Reading Series
Thursday, November 29, 8:30 pm
(Poison Girl, 1641 Westheimer Rd)
Founded and currently organized by UH Creative Writing students and alumni, Poison Pen was voted Houston’s Best Reading Series in 2014 by the Houston Press. Poison Pen brings in three readers on the last Thursday of each month. Poison Pen’s readers are locally and nationally recognizable writers of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.

Glass Mountain Issue #22 Launch Party 
Tuesday, December 4, 7pm
(Café Brasil, 2604 Dunlavy Street)
Glass Mountain is a national undergraduate literary magazine run by undergraduates at UH. This launch party will feature a reading by students published in the newest issue with an open mic to follow. The open mic is open to all. Cake will be provided.