Casey Dué Hackney
 
 

Casey Dué Hackney

Department of Modern and Classical Languages

University of Houston

Houston, TX 77204-3784


CURRENT POSITION: Professor and Director of Classical Studies, Department of Modern and Classical Languages, University of Houston; Executive Editor, Center for Hellenic Studies, Washington, D.C.


SPECIAL INTERESTS: (1) Homeric poetry (2) Greek oral traditions (3) Greek tragedy (4) textual criticism


EDUCATION


    Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 1996-2001

    - M.A. in Classical Philology 1998; Ph.D. in Classical Philology 2001


    American School for Classical Studies, Athens, Summer Session 1998


    Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 1992-1996

    - B.A. in Latin and Greek, magna cum laude with departmental honors and Phi Beta Kappa 1996


AWARDS AND GRANTS


      “Editing as a Discovery Process: Accessing centuries of scholarship in one 10th-century manuscript of the Iliad.” National Endowment for the Humanities and Center for Hellenic Studies. Principal Investigator: Casey Dué Hackney. (2013-2016; $426,115)


     “Who Owns the Past?” National Endowment for the Humanities. Principal Investigator: Casey Dué Hackney. (Academic Year 2012-2013; $20,881)

   

    University of Houston Teaching Excellence Provost’s Core Award 2011


    University of Houston Award for Excellence in Research and Scholarship 2010


     “The Oral Poetics of the Homeric Doloneia.” National Endowment for the Humanities. Principal Investigators: Casey Dué Hackney and Mary Ebbott. (Academic Year 2007-8; $80,000)


     “The Homer Multitext.” University of Houston Grant to Enhance and Advance Research. Principal Investigator: Casey Dué Hackney. (Academic Year 2006-7; $30,000)


    College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences Teaching Excellence Award 2004


    Certificates of Distinction in Teaching (Harvard University):

        The Concept of the Hero in Greek Civilization 1999, Latin A 1999, The Rome of Augustus 2000


PUBLICATIONS


   The Homer Multitext Project (ed., with Mary Ebbott). Center for Hellenic Studies, on-going.


     Mothers-in-Arms: Soldiers’ Emotional Bonds and Homeric Similes” (with Mary Ebbott). War, Literature & the Arts 24 (2012).


     “Homeric Scholia and the Multitextuality of the Iliad” (with Mary Ebbott). In V. Bers, D. Elmer, and L. Muellner, eds. Donum natalicium digitaliter confectum Gregorio Nagy septuagenario a discipulis collegis familiaribus oblatum: A Virtual Birthday Gift Presented to Gregory Nagy on Turning Seventy by his Students, Colleages, and Friends. Center for Hellenic Studies, 2012.

   

       “Lament as Speech Act in Sophocles.” In K. Ormand, ed., A Companion to Sophocles. Oxford: Blackwell, 2012 (236–250).


     “Maneuvers in the dark of night: Iliad 10 in the twenty-first century.” In F. Montanari, A. Rengakos, and C. Tsagalis, eds., Homeric Contexts: Neoanalysis and the Interpretation of Oral Poetry. Walter de Gruyter, 2011 (165–173).


    Iliad 10 and the Poetics of Ambush: A Multitext Edition with Essays and Commentary (with Mary Ebbott). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2010.


    “Agamemnon’s Densely-packed Sorrow in Iliad 10: A Hypertextual Reading of a Homeric Simile.” In C. Tsagalis, ed., Homeric Hypertextuality. Trends in Classics 2 (2010): 279-299.


    Recapturing a Homeric Legacy: Images and Insights from the Venetus A Manuscript of the Iliad (ed.).Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009.


    “Digital Criticism: Editorial Standards for the Homer Multitext.” Digital Humanities Quarterly 3.1 (Winter, 2009).


    “Digital Images of Iliad Manuscripts from the Marciana Library” (ed.,with Christopher Blackwell, Mary Ebbott, and Neel Smith). First Drafts@Classics@ (10/2007).


    “Oral Poetics and the Homeric Doloneia” (with Mary Ebbott). First Drafts@Classics@ (edition of 7/11/2007).


    “Learning Lessons From The Trojan War: Briseis and the Theme of Force.” College Literature 34 (2007): 229-262.


    "The Invention of Ossian." Classics@ 3 (2006).


    The Captive Woman's Lament in Greek Tragedy. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2006.


    “Homer's Post-Classical Legacy.” In J. M. Foley, ed., A Companion to Ancient Epic. Oxford: Blackwell, 2005.


    “Achilles, Mother Bird: Similes and Traditionality in Homeric Poetry.” Classical Bulletin 81 (2005): 3-18.


    “Illuminating the Classics with the Heroes of Philostratus” (with Gregory Nagy). In E. Aitken and J. Maclean, eds., Philostratus: Heroikos, Religion, and Cutural Identity. Atlanta, Ga.: Society of Biblical Literature, 2004.


    “Amor, pérdida, y nostalgia in Los persas de Eschilo.” In A. M. G. de Tobia, ed., Ética y Estética. De Grecia a la modernidad. Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina, 2004.


    “As Many Homers As You Please: An On-line Multitext of Homer.” (with Mary Ebbott). Classics@ 2 (2004).


    “What is Oral Poetry? Ancient Greek Oral Genres.” Oral Tradition 18 (2003): 62-64.


    “Preliminaries to Philostratus' On Heroes” (with Gregory Nagy). In E. Aitken and J. Maclean, eds., Philostratus: On Heroes. Atlanta, Ga.: Society of Biblical Literature, 2003.


    Homeric Variations on a Lament by Briseis. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield Press, 2002.


    “Achilles’ Golden Amphora in Aeschines' Against Timarchus and the Afterlife of Oral Tradition.” Classical Philology 96 (2001): 33-47. [Reprinted in Greek Literature, Volume I: The Oral Traditional Background of Ancient Greek Literature. ed. G. Nagy. New York: Routledge, 2001.]


    “Sunt Aliquid Manes: Homer, Plato, and Alexandrian Allusion in Propertius 4.7.” Classical Journal 96 (2001): 401-413.


    (ed., with Mary Ebbott and Dimitrios Yatromanolakis) Homer and the Papyri. Center for Hellenic Studies, 2001-present.


    “Tragic History and Barbarian Speech in Sallust's Jugurtha.” Harvard Studies in Classical Philology 100 (2000): 311-325.


    “Poetry and the Demos: State Regulation of a Civic Possession.” Stoa Consortium (2000). [Reprinted in Greek Literature, Volume V: Greek literature in the Classical period: The Prose of Historiography and Oratory. ed. G. Nagy. New York: Routledge, 2001.]


    "Performance and Performer: The Role of Tradition in Oral Epic Song." Milman Parry Collection (1999).


CONFERENCE PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS


      “Savage Greeks in Foreign Lands: Greeks and Barbarians in the Tragedies of Euripides.” The Martin Weiner Lecture in Classical Studies. Brandeis University, April 25, 2013.


      “Royal Iliads and Digital Criticism: A fresh look at the eleventh-century manuscripts in el Real Monasterio de San Lorenzo de el Escorial.” (Part of the organized panel Reinventing the Critical Edition: New Developments in the Homer Multitext Project.) CAMWS Annual Meeting, Baton Rouge, LA, March 29-31, 2012.


     “Mothers-in-Arms and Leaves in Season: An Exploration of the Interaction between Theme and Poetics in the Iliad and Odyssey.” Homer on the Range. University of Texas at Austin, February 9-10, 2012.


    “An ambush in the midst of battle and a surprise battle on the journey home: the themes of lokhos, polemos, and nostos in the Iliad and Odyssey.” Indiana University, February 17, 2011.


    “The Homer Multitext.” E-Codices Workshop 2010. Fribourg, Stwizerland, June 24-25, 2010.


    “Maneuvers in the dark of night: Iliad 10 in the twenty-first century.” Homer in the 21st century: Orality, Neoanalysis, Interpretation. Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece, May 27-29, 2010.


    “Rediscovering Homer: Manuscript Digitization and the Homer Multitext Project.” Handschriften- und Textforschung heute. Hamburg, Germany, April 21-23, 2010.


    “The Homer Multitext: Next Steps.” Philology in the Age of Corpus and Computational Linguistics. Tufts University, January 13-14, 2010.


    “Rediscovering Homer: Manuscript Digitization and the Homer Multitext Project.” 18th Hellenic Academic Libraries Conference. University of Patras, Greece, November 4, 2009.


    “New Light on an Ancient Text: Accessing the Iliad through the Lens of the Venetus A Manuscript.” The annual conference of the International Documentation Committee of the International Council of Museums: “The Digital Curation of Cultural Heritage.” Athens, Greece, September 15-18, 2008.


    “Homer and History in the Venetus A.” (Part of the organized panel Rediscovering Homer: Capturing the Venetus A Manuscript of the Iliad.) CAMWS Annual Meeting, Tucson, AZ, April 17-19, 2008.


    “Agamemnon's Densely-packed Sorrow in Iliad 10: How to Read a Homeric Simile.” College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA, March 12, 2008.


    “Flowers of Commemoration: Ancient and Modern Interpretations of the Death of Young Men in the Iliad.” Bates College, Lewiston, ME, March 10, 2008.


    “Digital Criticism: Standards for the Homer Multitext.” Changing the Center of Gravity: Transforming Classical Studies through Cyberinfrastructure. Lexington, KY, October 4-5, 2007.


    “Creatures of the Night in Greek Epic.” CAMWS Annual Meeting, Cincinnati, OH, April 11-14, 2007.


    “Iliad X and the Poetics of Ambush.” CAMWS Annual Meeting, Gainseville, FL, April 6-8, 2006.


    “Reading the Iliad in the twenty-first century: Wolfgang Petersen’s Troy and Simone Weil’s The Iliad or The Poem of Force." University of Missouri, January 31, 2006.


    “The Invention of Ossian.” The Homerizon: Conceptual Interrogations in Homeric Studies. Center for Hellenic Studies, Washington, DC, June 27-29, 2005.


    “Electronic Editions and Digital Libraries: The Homer Multitext and Classical Text Services Protocol.” Ancient Studies, New Technologies III, James Madison University, December 4, 2004.


    “Achilles, Mother Bird: Similes and Traditionality in Homeric Poetry.” CAMWS Annual Meeting, St. Louis, MO, April 15-17, 2004.


    “Animal Similes in Early Greek Poetry and Art.” Lecture to accompany special exhibit, The Centaur’s Smile: The Human Animal in Early Greek Art. Museum of Fine Arts Houston, March 11, 2004.


    “Love, Loss, and Longing in the Persians of Aeschylus.” Rice University, November 13, 2003.


    “Amor, pérdida, y nostalgia in Los persas de Eschilo.” Ética y Estética. De Grecia a la modernidad, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina, June 10-13, 2003.


    “Women's Songs and Men's Songs: Gender, Genre, and the Development of Homeric Poetry.” CAMWS Annual Meeting, Lexington, KY, April 3-5, 2003.


    “As Many Homers as You Please: An On-line Multitext of Homer.” APA Annual Meeting, New Orleans, January 3-6, 2003.


    “The Captive Woman's Lament.” CAMWS Annual Meeting, Austin, April 4-6, 2002.


    “The Captive Woman's Lament and Her Revenge in the Hecuba of Euripides.” International Women's Day Panel, Women and War. University of Houston, March 11, 2002.


    “Teaching Philostratus' Heroikos.” Philostratus' Heroikos, Religion, and Cultural Identity. Harvard University, May 4-6, 2001.


    “Rediscovering Homer.” Harvard University Alumni College Weekend, October 28-29, 2000.


    “Teaching Homer in a Global Classroom.” New Information Technologies and Liberal Education, Furman University, May 5-7, 2000.


    “Poetry and the Dêmos: State Regulation of a Civic Possession.” CAMWS Annual Meeting, Knoxville, April 5-8, 2000.


    “Albert B. Lord: A Multimedia Event.” Harvard University, May 7, 1999.


    “Sunt Aliquid Manes: Homer, Plato, and Alexandrian Allusion in Propertius IV 7.” CAMWS Annual Meeting, Cleveland, April 17, 1999.


    “The Golden Amphora: Aeschines and the Preservation of Oral Poetry.” The COMPONO Conference, SUNY Buffalo, April 3-5, 1998.


TEACHING


    Who Owns Antiquity?, University of Houston, Spring 2013

    Myth and Performance in Greek Tragedy, University of Houston Spring 2010

     Gender and Race in Greek Myth, University of Houston, Fall 2008

    Comparative Epic, University of Houston, Fall 2008, 2010

    From Homer to Hollywood: Archaic and Classical Greek Themes in Modern Cinema, University of Houston, Fall 2005 and 2009, Spring 2007

    Greek Art and Archaeology: In Search of the Trojan War, University of Houston, 2004, 2008, 2012

    Greek and Roman Myths of Heroes, University of Houston, Fall 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2012; Spring 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010

    Myths and Cult of the Greek Gods, University of Houston, 2002, 2003, 2010, 2011

    Fifth Century Athens, University of Houston, 2003, 2004, 2011, 2013

    Greek 1301-1302: Beginning Greek, University of Houston, 2001-2006

    Greek 2301-2302: Intermediate Greek, University of Houston, 2002-2006

    Greek 3398: Scribes and Scholars: The Transmission of Homeric Poetry from Oral Tradition to Medieval Manuscripts, University of Houston, Fall 2010, Spring 2009

    Greek 3398: Euripides, University of Houston, Spring 2011, Fall 2005

    Greek 3398/4398 Readings in Ancient Greek Prose: Plato’s Phaedrus in Context, University of Houston, Fall 2008

    Greek 3398/4398: Ancient Greek Novel, University of Houston, Spring 2007

    Greek 3398: Aristophanes, University of Houston, Spring 2004

    Greek 3398: The Iliad, University of Houston, Fall 2003, Spring 2006

    Greek 3398: Homer, Herodotus, and Thucydides, University of Houston, Fall 2002 and 2009

    Greek 3398: The Odyssey, University of Houston, Fall 2001

    Greek 4398: Euripides and Demosthenes, University of Houston, Spring 2003

    Greek 4398: Sophocles, University of Houston, Spring 2002, Fall 2006

    Latin 1301-1302: Elementary Latin, University of Houston, 2010-2011

    Latin 3301: Readings in Latin Literature, University of Houston, Fall 2011

    Latin 4398: The Aeneid, University of Houston, Spring 2003, Fall 2006

    Latin 4398: Sallust, University of Houston, Spring 2002

    The Concept of the Hero in Greek Civilization, Harvard University, 1998-2001

    Undergraduate Seminar: Virgin Sacrifice in Greek Tragedy, Harvard University, Spring 2000

    The Concept of the Hero in Greek Civilization, Harvard Extension School, Spring 2000

   The Rome of Augustus, Harvard University, Spring 2000

    Latin A, Harvard University, Fall 1999

    Greek 4: Selections from Homer's Iliad, Harvard University, Spring 1999

   Cicero and Livy, Harvard University, Fall 1998


RELATED EXPERIENCE


    Executive Editor, Milman Parry Collection of Oral Literature 1999-present

    Academic and Residential Adviser, Freshman Dean's Office, Harvard University, 1999-2001

    Co-Project Leader, Homeric Odyssey and the Cultivation of Justice, Spring 2000

    Co-Project Leader, Homer's Poetic Justice, Spring 1999

    Graduate Writing Fellow, Harvard University, Fall 1999


REFERENCES:


    Richard Armstrong (Richard.Armstrong@mail.uh.edu)

    Dora Pozzi (dcpozzi@uh.edu)

    Gregory Nagy (gnagy@fas.harvard.edu)

Casey’s curriculum vitae