Parish Management 1340-1359

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1325:

1343

  • H1343 A. Worcestershire. Alianora de Sudle v. Robert de More parson of Churchlench. Trespass taking of two oxen. Plea that he as parson took heriot. [1] rcp
  • E1343 A: Leicestershire. Abbot of Miravalle v. John parson of Sheyl, Richard de Horsley de Sheyl, Richard Lorot de Sheyl, Henry de Stafford de Sheyl, Ralph Oky de Sheyl, John le Prudt de Sheyl and Thomas Matoun de Sheyl. Trespass: taking of goods (wheat, barley, peas worth 10 ps. John defended as parson of Sheyl that the crops were crops in sheaves and tithes of his church separated from the nine parts, and the others were his servants. [2] rcp

1344

  • H1344 A: Peter Gretheved parson of Richmond v. John Wichard of Richmond, Peter Taverner del Hill chaplain, and William de Burton de Richmond. Gretheved had assigned William Elys chaplain to received to Gretheved's use all the oblations offered to the chapel of the Holy Trinity of the parish of Richmond, which offerings pertained to him as parson. Defendants in 1343 impeded him. Guilty by verdict with damages of 60s. [3] rcp

1345

  • H1345 A: Inquiry at the petition of John son of John Lestraunge de Whitchirche parson of the king's free chapel of St Michael within the castle of Shrewsbury against Lewis de Cherleton and Phillip ap Howell, portioners of the church of Pontesbury, about whether the greater and lesser tithes in 6 towns and of four mills pertain to the free chapel. The inquest finds that the tithes did so belong, were worth 40s/year, and had been taken by the portioners for four years. Prolonged further process.[4] rcp
  • H1345 B: Sussex. John de Goldyngham v. John le Reade and Walter de Lynderegge. Trespass for the taking of goods (wheat, oats) worth 40s at Ulting in 1344. Defendants pleaded that they took wehat worth 6d and that that wheat was in sheaves as tithes separated from the nine, so that they took the wheat as servants of the rectory. [5] rcp


1346

  • E1346 A: Bedfordshire. John de Pipe prebendary of Leighton-Buzzard in the church of Blessed Mary of Lincoln v. John de Marleford bailiff of Grovebury. Trespass: impeding the Pipe's men and servants who were collecting the tithes of sheaves in the fields of Leighton-Buzzard and arresting two carts with the attached horses and detaining them so long that by intemperate air the grains worth 40 p.s. rotted. [6], [7] rcp
  • M1346 A: Hampshire. Nicholas Magor parson of Depden v. Walter le White parson of Cam. Trespass assault and taking of goods worth 100s at Botesashe in 1344. Defendant pleaded that he was procurator of Thomas de Brene parson of Fawley, and there was a dispute between Nicholas and Thomas over certain tithes issuing from a place called Botesashe such that Nicholas sued Thomas before in the consistory court of Winchester before the commissary of Adam late bishop of Winchester. Witnesses proved that the wool belonged to the church of Fawley and that that place was part of the parish of Fawley, and so it was adjuged. Walter as procurator of Thomas came in the presence of notary and by the order of the official of the place took the wool. Jury summons. [8] rcp


1347

  • E1347 A: Hertfordshire. Richard Picot lately parson of Bennington v. Lawrence de Wyndesore clerk and Robert Laurenseservaunt de Wyndesore. Trespass taking of goods worth 10 p.s. at Bennington in 1345. Defendant pleaded that he and Picot had agreed to exchange churches and that Lawrence would have all the goods and chattels in the Bennington rectory when Picot was rector, and he found the said goods in the rectory. [9] rcp

1348

  • E1348 A: Buckinghamshire. Prior of the Hospital of St John of Jerusalem v. William de Musckham parson of Denham. Trespass taking of goods and chattels at Denham worth 10 marks. William pleaded that he is parson of Denham; there is a meadow within his parish from which he and his predecessors have been accustomed to take tithes. The hay taken was the tithes tithed by the servants of the prior and separated from the nine parts. The parson took them as well he might without doing anything against the peace. Jury summons. [10]

1350:

H1350 A: Norfolk. Thomas de Whatton v. John de Brinkele cleric. Trespass: taking of goods and chattels worth 100 p.s. at West Bradenham in May 1349. Brinkele pleaded that he had demised to Whatton, Thomas le Grovere, and William Styngyn his church of West Bradenham with all fruits together with the manse of the church except the hall, chamber, and bakehouse for a term of three years for 35 marks, the lessee to pay tenths to the king and to find a parish chaplain and to sustain all other burdens incumbent on the church. Brinkele was granted the right to re-enter if the rent was in arrear in whole or in part or any of the covenants were broken. In 1349 the rent was arrear; they had not found a chaplain or paid the burdens. Jury summoned. [11] rcp

M1351 A: Leicestershire. Andrew Broun parson of Desborough v. Thomas de Pulteneye parson of half the church of Misterton, Robert Russel chaplain, William Cade de Medburn, John Suel de Medburn, William Parent de Misterton, John Balle de Misterton, John Brynkelowe de Misterton, and Nicholas son of Geoffrey de Walcote de Lutterworth, and Richard brother of the same Nicholas. Trespass taking of goods (various grains and vegetables worth 20 p.s.) and chattels at Misterton in December 1349. Pulteneye pleaded that Broun in 1348 was parson of that half of Misterton church and resigned it into the hands of the bishop of Lincoln. William Broun as patron presented William de Medburn cleric, and he was installed in 1349. Medburn found the glebe land sewn so that by virtue of the installation he had property in the crop. Broun, by virtue of the resignation, was wholly removed. Medburn, languishing in extremis constituted as his executors William Suel and John Cade. They harvested the crops and put it in a barn together with the tithes of the church from 1349: the whole is what the plaintiff claims. They sold the grain to Pulteneye. The others just helped carry it away after the sale. [12] rcp

M1351 A: Leicestershire. Andrew Broun parson of Desborough v. Thomas de Pulteneye parson of half the church of Misterton, Robert Russel chaplain, William Cade de Medburn, John Suel de Medburn, William Parent de Misterton, John Balle de Misterton, John Brynkelowe de Misterton, and Nicholas son of Geoffrey de Walcote de Lutterworth, and Richard brother of the same Nicholas. Trespass taking of goods (various grains and vegetables worth 20 p.s.) and chattels at Misterton in December 1349. Pulteneye pleaded that Broun in 1348 was parson of that half of Misterton church and resigned it into the hands of the bishop of Lincoln. William Broun as patron presented William de Medburn cleric, and he was installed in 1349. Medburn found the glebe land sewn so that by virtue of the installation he had property in the crop. Broun, by virtue of the resignation, was wholly removed. Medburn, languishing in extremis constituted as his executors William Suel and John Cade. They harvested the crops and put it in a barn together with the tithes of the church from 1349: the whole is what the plaintiff claims. They sold the grain to Pulteneye. The others just helped carry it away after the sale. [13] rcp

H1352 A: Sussex. Abbot of Battle v. Richard de Hurst, Richard de Strode, and Hugh vicar of Bexhill on Sea. Trespass: taking of goods (various crops) worth 10 p.s. at Bernehorne in 1351. The place is a hamlet of Bexhill on Sea (Buxele), where the Bishop of Chichester is parson. The crops were tithes pertaining to the rectory as the tenth separted from the nine parts. Hurst took those crops as bailiff of the bishop; and the others assisted. Jury summoned. [14] rcp

H1352 B:Essex. It was presented that, whereas the Prior of Lewes is the parson of Matching and for his non-residence and for the souls of the patrons he is customarily obligated to give 20s/yr (or the equivalent in crops) to the poor of Matching, he has withdrawn that payment now for 24 years. [15] rcp

M1353 A: Norfolk. It was presented that Edmund parson of Manteby for four years beginning in 22 Edward III took named crops in sheaves worth 30s/year from the portion of tithes that belonged to the Prior of Merton. [16] rcp

  • H1356 A: Nottinghamshire. John Raven, cleric v. John Gerveys de Leeyk parson of Bonyngton, John de Burton chaplain, Stephen Scarlet, and Gilber de Hatherne. Trespass, taking of goods (specified crops in sheaves) worth 100s at Normanton in 1354. Gerveys pleaded as the parson of St Michael Bonington. The crops had grown on land within his parish and the tithes had been separated from the nines. Jury summons. [17] rcp
  • H1356 B: Gloucestershire. Abbot of Tewkesbury v. John de Brampton parson of St Peter, Bristol, and John Wachet tapermakere. Trespass: taking of 60 piglets and 80 geese at Mangotsfield in 1355. Brampton pleaded, as to six piglets and six geese, that the chapel of Mangotsfield is annexed to St Peter, Bristol. The twelve animals were sent there as tithes, and so he took them. [18], [19], [20] rcp
  • H1357 A: Devon. John de Uppecote v. John Hute parson of Cheriton fitzpaine. Trespass: taking of goods (100s worth of wheat and oats)at Stockley Lokcombe in 1355. Defendant denied cutting the crops, but said the crops were tithes owed to his church and he took them as such. Jury summons. [21] rcp
  • E1357 A: Oxfordshire. Prior of St Frideswide of Oxford v. John vicar of Headington. Trespass: taking of goods (wheat, barley, oats, beans, peas, in sheaves) worth 20 ps. Hute pleaded that by composition and long tradition the vicar had taken the lesser tithes in curtilages, as with honey and leeks. The land on which the crops in dispute grew had been a curtilage, but after the pestilence was converted into arable. Thus a dispute arose between the prior and the vicar. Before the consistory court of the bishop of Lincoln, Hute prosecuted to such an extent that he recovered the tithes, and so he took the tithes separated from the nine by virtue of the recovery. [22]. rcp
  • M1358 A: Norfolk. John Balston v. Edmund Blunvill parson of Brome, Phillip Chaumpayn chaplain, Richard Andrew de Brome, and Adam Pelkon. Trespass: taking of goods worth 10 p.s. in 1357. Pleaded that the parson had leased jointly to Balston and Phillip de Cotton chaplain the church of Brome with all fruits, crops, tithes, oblations, rents, dovecots, profits etc with entry to all parts of the houses of the rectory except for a room in the principal cellar and a stable for one year for 18 marks with a right of entry on non-payment at any of the three terms of payment; the parson entered because the rent was arrear. [23] rcp
  • E1359 A: Norfolk. In 32 Edward III: "clausum Johannis fitz Wauter chivaler apud Disce videlicet clausum rectorie ecclesie de Disce in manibus Johannis fitz Wauter chivaler existente ex dimissione Willelmi Baltrip parsone dicte ecclesie et concessione Thomas episcopi Norwici usque ad certum tempus intraverunt." [24] rcp
  • M1359 A: Cambridgeshire. Robert Waryn de Offord Daneys v. Thomas Le Moigne cleric. Trespass taking of goods and chattels (clothes, household utensils, wood) at Over at damages of 100 ps. Le Moigne pleaded that Master Andrew de Offord was the parson of Over and had appointed him his general attorney with full power to administer all Andrew's goods and chattels at Over as elsewhere by letters patent. He said he took the goods and chattels that were in the rectory as Andrew's goods and chattels as well he might without taking any of Robert's gods. [25] rcp
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