Erith Documents

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E1318 A: Ship was loaded at Little Yarmouth with goods worth 100 marks bound for London; defendants at Erith took some of the goods and sank the rest. William Lambyn of London merchant and Richard de Hodeston of London merchant v. Alan atte Forde of Faversham and Henry Aleynescosyn atte Ford. [1]. Verdict: William and Richard delivered herring to Alan to be carried to London at their peril. Alan put the herring in his ship, but the sailors were less wise. They went toward the Thames near Erith and there by negligence wrecked the ship. Some sailors in boats who were there then took six last of herrings, and those herrings afterwards went to the profit of William and Richard. The remainder (four and a half lasts) the ship's sailors took and sold for their own profit. Alan thereafter accepted what his sailors had done. The damages of William and Richard came to 70 marks. Plaintiffs recover. Enrollment indicates that the the wrong was not against the king's peace. [2]

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