Construction Management Senior Achieves Nation’s Highest Score on AIC Exam


Ethan Jeffcoat
Ethan Jeffcoat

For the fourth time in a row, a student enrolled in construction management program at the University of Houston has earned the highest score in the nation on the rigorous American Institute of Constructors (AIC) exam. Ethan Jeffcoat, who looks forward to graduating in May 2017, scored 281 out of 300 - 93.6%. The overall UH passing rate is 78.8%, while the national average is 67%. Ethan's achievement is especially impressive as he maintained a 4.0 GPA while also working as a service consultant intern at CenterPoint Energy. He is serving as the president of the UH Student Chapter of the Officer of the Associated Builders and Contractors and is a member of Sigma Lambda Chi, the international construction honor society. He also minors in Business Administration.

Ethan said that his interest and encouragement to pursue a career in construction began as a young child, growing up and following the footsteps of his father who could do almost any kind of work it seemed - from water line construction to welding projects, construction build-outs, and carpentry. Often he would be right there beside his father, imitating him and crafting his own projects. "I was always playing around with Lego building sets," he said. I had no idea that it would lead me into to a profession about which I'd be so passionate."

Many accredited construction management programs require students to take the AIC certification exam; but, the UH program in the College of Technology is the only one to require it for graduation. With a passing score on the exam and four years of professional experience, students can sit for the second level exam, the Certified Professional Constructor (CPC). The CPC is similar to the Professional Engineering license for engineers.

Proud to carry on the tradition as the highest scorer on the exam, Ethan attributes his success to his experience with faculty mentors, intensive preparation for the strenuous eight-hour exam, focused review sessions that included learning the art of critical thinking, and study groups with his peers.