COT Student Earns Eisenhower Transportation Award

Yang Cheng, a master's student in Supply Chain and Logistics Technology, recently received the Dwight David Eisenhower Transportation Fellowship, available via the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Highway Administration.

The fellowship is an intermodal, congressionally mandated program and is a key component of the transportation education pipeline, providing grants to encourage undergraduate and graduate students to pursue transportation education, research and careers.

Cheng said he is thrilled to have been selected and thinks that receiving this scholarship will shed more light on his work.

"I'm really excited about this fellowship because it is the best encouragement and acceptance for our long-term research. It's great that more and more people realize the potential and capacity of our research," Cheng said. "We hope to improve the emission problems in Texas with Houston as our first objective."

Receiving the scholarship has motivated Cheng to pursue his career.

"It not only helps me pay my tuition fee," Cheng said. "But it gives me more motivation. More people understand our work and value us for improving the transportation system in the U.S."

Cheng has received scholarships for his academic performance in the past. He was a recipient of the Logistical Advantage Scholarship from the College of Technology in spring 2011 and also received three scholarships for outstanding academic performance when he was an undergraduate in China.

"Yang has worked very hard and is deserving of this national recognition." Said Dr. Ray Cline, Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies. "His research and emissions simulations are important tools to address the needs of the Houston region as it seeks to continue economic growth, while meeting the challenges of environmental concerns. This research will greatly benefit from the funding and support of the Department of Transportation."

Cheng plans to turn his studies into a career that will directly affect those living in the Houston area.

"I want to continue the study of emissions," Cheng said. "I think my work benefits for the quality of our lives and helps to reduce the impact of the energy crisis."