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Course Descriptions

EMDR and Play Therapy in the Treatment of Complex Trauma

Addressing Ethical Challenges: Integrating a Trauma Perspective in Clinical Practice

How to Start and Manage a Successful Non-Profit

Clinical Supervision in Social Work

Identifying, Assessing, and Treating Suicidal Behavior

Finding Jenn’s Voice-The Link Between Domestic Violence and Pregnancy (A Documentary Film with Small and Large Group Discussions)

Ethics, Language, and Trauma-Informed Strategies! Inclusive Engagement with Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Communities

Advanced Clinical Supervision in Social Work (Refresher Course)

Adult Psychopathology: DSM-5, Assessment, and Treatment

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EMDR and Play Therapy in the Treatment of Complex Trauma

Date: Friday, February 10, 2017

Time: 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Location: UH Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $65 (Early Bird Registration)  $80 (Registration after January 27, 2017)

Course: 17SSW0272C

CEUs: 3 CEUs

About the Course

When a child experiences traumatic events and maintains a physically or emotionally debilitating belief, how can she heal and move on to effective, healthy living? What options exist when our innate human information processing system becomes blocked? Despite the wonder, freedom and safety of play therapy, many children remain locked in pain and fear. How can a child access this maladaptive stored information, for which she may not even have words, concepts or safety for expressing, and then reprocess it so it becomes integrated and useful in life? Through a combination of EMDR Therapy and Play Therapy, children can process both big T and little T traumas and reach a meaningful resolution integrating mind, heart and body. When this occurs, learning takes place, and the experiences is stored with appropriate emotions able to guide the person in the future. The presentation will cover the basic concepts of EMDR Therapy, an evidenced based therapeutic protocol, and the AIP Model. The speaker will discuss how play therapy can be integrated with EMDR Therapy to more effectively address trauma with children and adolescents.

Objectives

Upon concluding this course, participants will be able to:

  • Understand and describe the basic concepts of EMDR Therapy and the AIP Model.
  • Identify ways to integrate Play Therapy into each of the 8 phases of the EMDR protocol.
  • Identify 6 ways to target a trauma utilizing Play Therapy and EMDR Therapy.
  • Discuss 3 benefits of integrating Play Therapy and EMDR Therapy in the treatment of trauma.
  • Know the steps to become an EMDR Therapist.

About the Instructors

Karen Sullivan began her career 24 years ago by helping children and families through her various positions at Children’s Protective Services, the Children’s Assessment Center, and Child Advocates of Fort Bend. During this time, Karen utilized play therapy to connect with children and help them process their traumas. Play therapy was effective, but there always seemed to be lingering negative thoughts, beliefs, emotions and bodily sensations. Once she was EMDR Trained in 2004, Karen realized that the protocols unlocked many of the lingering issues and provided for deeper processing and insights. Since that time, Karen has utilized play therapy in conjunction with EMDR. In 2013, Karen opened her private practice in Sugar Land where she specializes in working with children and adults experiencing trauma and attachment issues.

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Addressing Ethical Challenges: Integrating a Trauma Perspective in Clinical Practice

Date: Thursday & Friday, February 16 -17, 2017

Time: 9:00AM - 4:00 PM

Location: Bo's Place 10500 Buffalo Speedway Houston, TX 77054

Course Fee: $250 (Includes the cost of both days)

Course: 17SSW0271C

CEUs: 12 CEUs (Including 3 Ethics CEUs)

About the Course

In the last decade, trauma has gained increasing attention in the United States as it relates to diverse populations. Ethical standards call for clinicians to have working knowledge and skill about trauma and its potential for long-lasting impact. This highly interactive, intensive two-day course, will provide participants with a valuable framework for understanding contemporary research about trauma, its manifestations, types, neurobiological aspects, and post-traumatic growth. Evidence based practices for clinical assessment and interventions with trauma will be addressed. Using a problem-based learning approach, participants will have an opportunity to integrate a trauma perspective in clinical practice through case vignettes and experiential exercises.

Objectives

At the end of the 12-hour training, participants will learn to:

  • Identify and address key ethical challenges related to working with trauma in clinical practice.
  • Develop a contemporary framework for understanding adverse childhood experiences, trauma, trauma types, manifestations, influencing factors, cultural influences, neurobiological aspects, post-traumatic growth, and resiliency.
  • Formulate a clinical approach for assessment of trauma across diverse practice settings.
  • Develop a trauma-informed practice approach and examine evidence-based practice treatment with various populations.
  • Integrate a trauma perspective in clinical practice.

About the Instructors

Sandra A. Lopez, LCSW, DCSW is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with over 35 years of clinical practice and consultation experience. Her primary areas of clinical expertise include trauma and grief. She is a retired Clinical Professor from the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work.

Patricia Taylor, Ph.D., LCSW is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with 30 years of clinical practice and consultation experience in Houston and Longview, Texas. She has served as Adjunct Faculty at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work. 

In the spring of 2011, Sandra A. Lopez and Patricia Taylor also co-developed and taught the first Trauma and Social Work Practice course at the UHGCSW. They both have had extensive training in problem based teaching of a national gold standard training curriculum called “Core Concepts of Childhood and Adolescent Trauma.” They have completed the two day training in Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TFCBT). 

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How to Start and Manage a Successful Non-Profit

Date: Friday, March 3, 2017

Time: 9:00AM - 5:00 PM

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $100

Course: 17SSW0280C

CEUs: 7 CEUs

About the Course

In this course, you will have fun as you learn how to start and manage a successful non-profit. Understanding how non-profits work is essential for any social worker. Whether your dream is to start your own nonprofit, climb the ladder to upper management in the agency for which you now work, or even if you just want to provide counseling services, you have to understand the skills of how non-profits operate and how you can advocate for yourself, your team and your clients. The best way to learn these skills is by doing, and this course offers a simulation of starting and running a successful nonprofit-everything from mission statements to grants to client service. Over the course of a day, learners will practice 12 skills essential to their future. Dozens of social workers have gone through the simulation and have raved about the experience and knowledge gained.

Objectives

Upon concluding this course, students will be able to:

  • Have fun while understanding the “real world” complexities of starting and managing a non-profit organization and dealing with staff and board roles.
  • Simulate decision making with scarce resources, incomplete information, and in an uncertain environment.
  • Work on 12 discreet skills, from budgeting to applying human resource principles to hiring staff.
  • Understand how to work cohesively with a management team and board of directors to make decisions.

About the Instructors

Joshua Reynolds, MSW, MBA is Director of United Way Care for Elders, a collaboration of organizations focused on aging. This collaboration includes nonprofits, public sector entities (local and state government), healthcare and other private/for-profit organizations, and faith-based as well as community groups. Before assuming these duties at the United Way, Josh was the Director of Planning and Evaluation for Neighborhood Centers, Inc., and Vice-President of Emerging Programs for Family Services of Greater Houston. Josh has worked in many different areas of non-profit management including executive leadership, program management, collaboration formulation, grant writing and other forms of fundraising, evaluation and impact modeling, mergers and acquisitions, strategic planning and visioning, and R&D (research and development). Josh holds a certificate in Executive Leadership from Rice University.

Richard Simonds, MSW is the Director of Thrive Connection at Family Houston where he manages a team helping Houstonians reach financial stability. Before assuming duties and responsibilities at Family Houston, Richard worked for a Fortune 500 financial firm where he helped individuals and families accumulate, protect and pass on multigenerational wealth. Richard and his team serve over 5,000 people a year in the Houston area. Richard has spoken locally, regionally and nationally about behavioral change, money management and credit. In addition, Richard has been featured in the Houston Chronicle and on KHOU. Richard also serves as an Adjunct Professor of Social Work at the University of Houston-Downtown.

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Clinical Supervision in Social Work

Date: Wednesday & Thursday, March 15-16 & 22-23, 2017

Time: 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM, plus 12 hours of independent, structured work

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work - Multipurpose Room

Course Fee: $550 (Early Bird Registration)  $600 (Registration after March 1, 2017)

Course: 17SSW0275C

CEUs: 40 CEUs (Including 6 Ethics CEUs)

About the Course

This 40-hour course is designed for Licensed Clinical Social Workers who are interested in advancing their knowledge, skill, and experience in clinical social work supervision and in fulfilling licensing requirements to be an approved LCSW supervisor (as set forth by the Texas State Board of Social Worker Examiners 781.102). This course will be delivered in 28 hours of face to face classroom work and in 12 hours of supervised independent, structured work designed for course preparation, exploration, reflection, and integration of content.

This 40-hour course will consist of five modules:

  • Module 1 Key Elements of Clinical Social Work Supervision: The Framework for an Effective Supervisory Relationship
  • Module 2 Process and Phases of Clinical Social Work Supervision: Developing the Novice to Master
  • Module 3 Supervisory Models and Methods: Developing Conceptual Knowledge of Methods and Techniques
  • Module 4 Critical Issues in Clinical Social Work Supervision: Facing the Challenges in the Supervisory Relationship
  • Module 5 Ethical and Legal Issues in Clinical Social Work Supervision

Participants will receive a 40 hour certificate of completion for the course (includes 6 hours of ethics training) if they have attended all 28 hours of face to face classroom work and completed all 12 hours of independent work.

About the Instructors

Sandra A. Lopez, LCSW, DCSW is a retired clinical professor of the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work and maintains a consulting practice in Houston. She has over 34 years of social work experience and has provided supervision and consultation to numerous social workers pursuing their LCSW.

Kay G. Schiller, LCSW, DCSW is a social worker with over 23 years of social work experience and maintains a clinical practice in Houston. She has served as Adjunct Faculty at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work and has provided LCSW supervision to social workers across a variety of social work settings.

Patricia Taylor, Ph.D., LCSW is a social worker with over 27 years of clinical practice and consultation experience in Houston and Longview, Texas. She has served as Adjunct Faculty at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work and has provided LCSW supervision to many LMSW’s since 1991. She has also taught a course on supervision and consultation within the UHGCSW.

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Identifying, Assessing, and Treating Suicidal Behavior

Date: Friday, March 24, 2017

Time: 9:00AM - 5:00 PM

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $100

Course: 17SSW0277C

CEUs: 3 CEUs

About the Course

Most social workers will encounter suicidal clients more than once in their careers. While suicide is the penultimate act we wish to avoid, practitioners must also intervene with non-fatal suicidal behaviors that occur with higher frequency. These include suicidal ideation or thoughts; suicidal verbalization, often in the forms of suicide threats, intentional self-harm, and suicide attempts. Research on suicidal behavior now indicates that non-fatal suicidal behaviors are often most effectively reduced via systematic focus and specialized intervention strategies. This course will assist social workers in identifying, assessing, and managing the clinical risks associated with suicidal behavior as well as expose them to the most recent empirical research advances in treating suicidal behavior.

Objectives

Upon concluding this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the incidence and prevalence of various suicidal behaviors in demographic and diagnostic groups.
  • Explore ethical considerations and implications related to suicidality.
  • Gain knowledge of the significance of culture, race, and ethnicity on suicidality.
  • Gain knowledge of religious/spiritual influences on suicidality.
  • Gain knowledge of risk, identification, and assessment of suicidal behaviors in children and adolescents.
  • Understand some core evidence-based treatment interventions for suicidality (e.g. Crisis Management, Psychopharmacology, CBT, DBT)

About the Instructors

Dr. Robin E. Gearing is an Associate Professor at the University of Houston and a Clinical Associate Professor at UT Health McGovern Medical School Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. For more than twenty years, he also has extensive experience practicing as a clinical social worker in psychosocial and mental health treatment service. Dr. Gearing’s program of research concentrates in the areas of adolescent mental health services use and treatment interventions. His research examines and seeks to build on improving and family treatment engagement, adherence, and developing evidence-based psychosocial treatment interventions for youth with mental illness and their families. In addition to other forums, findings from Dr. Gearing’s research have appeared in over 50 peer-review journal publications.

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Finding Jenn’s Voice-The Link Between Domestic Violence and Pregnancy (A Documentary Film with Small and Large Group Discussions)

Date: Thursday, March 30, 2017

Time: 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Location: CPS, 2525 Murworth Dr. Houston, TX. Free parking at this location.

Course Fee: $65

Course: 17SSW0281C

CEUs: 3 CEUs

About the Course

For many women pregnancy is a happy event. However, for many other women, it is a time of heartbreak, as pregnancy is the first sign that violence is a very real part of their relationship. In “Finding Jenn’s Voice-The Link between Domestic Violence and Pregnancy”, domestic violence homicides and pregnancy are examined through research and real life discussion by survivors. Join us for the documentary film viewing and small and large group discussions. Specific attention will be paid to advocacy issues in the Houston/Harris County community and within CPS.

Objectives

Upon concluding this course, participants will be able to:

  • The link between pregnancy and the increase in domestic violence.
  • How pregnancy increases the threat of domestic violence-related homicides.
  • How social workers and community advocates collaborate to create safety for women.
  • How the injustices of violence impact women and families across social, racial, economic, and political lines.

About the Instructors

Donna K. Amtsberg, LCSW has her clinical license and her MSW from the Graduate College of Social Work at the University of Houston. Donna is a Clinical Assistant Professor at the GCSW and is Director of the Child Trauma Program. She began working with survivors of domestic violence at the Houston Area Women’s Center in the early 1990’s, and in 1994 joined the District Attorney’s Family Criminal Law Division as a caseworker. She is currently on the board of the Harris County Domestic Violence Coordinating Council and chaired the Harris County Adult Violent Death Review Team from 2005-2015.

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Ethics, Language, and Trauma-Informed Strategies! Inclusive Engagement with Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Communities

Date: Friday, April 7, 2017

Time: 8:30AM - 12:30 PM

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $65 (Early Bird Registration) $80 (after March 24, 2017)

Course: 17SSW0279C

CEUs: 4 CEUs (Including 3 Ethics CEUs)

About the Course

With the current influx of legislation targeting the transgender and gender non-conforming communities throughout the country, it is more important than ever for helping professionals and organizations to provide inclusive and competent programming to the transgender and gender non-conforming identified communities they serve. The content of this session will outline basic definitions and language within the context of the transgender and gender non-conforming communities, identify the impact of organizational and legislative policy, and explore unique barriers to care these communities face. This session will also provide participants with interactive discussion and opportunities to brainstorm best practices for implementing these strategies in their own work and organizations.

Objectives

Upon concluding this course, students will be able to:

  • Recognize terms, definitions, and language related to gender identity and gender expression, and identify the importance for helping professionals to understand these terms.
  • Evaluate organizational policies, practices, and environment, and identify barriers transgender and gender non-conforming identified clients may face to accessing services.
  • Discuss the NASW Code of Ethics and ethical obligations for helping individuals in regard to providing services to gender-diverse populations.
  • Brainstorm and discuss strategies for the implementation of best practices, the creation of more inclusive programming and for professional involvement on multiple systems levels.

About the Instructors

Nikki Vogel, LMSW is a licensed master social worker and has served as the Director of Public Relations for the Texas Transgender Nondiscrimination Summit for the past two years. Her experience includes facilitating and co-facilitating lectures, workshops, and professional presentations covering advocacy for LGBT rights, inclusive policy, and ethical practice on college campuses across the state of Texas. She is also involved in political and legislative advocacy at the organizational, local, and state levels. She obtained her BSW from the University of Houston-Clear Lake and her MSSW from the University of Texas at Austin.

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Advanced Clinical Supervision in Social Work (Refresher Course)

Date: Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Time: 9:00AM - 12:00 PM

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $65 (Early Bird Registration) $80 (after March 29, 2017)

Course: 17SSW0276C

CEUs: 3 CEUs

About the Course

Using the ground-breaking work of Stephen R. Covey (Seven Habits of Highly Effective People) as a framework, this 3-hour session will explore seven areas of significance to clinical social work supervisors. This highly interactive session will briefly define the significance of areas in the process of supervision, allow for individual participant’s assessment of their strengths and limitations, and ultimately identify specific strategies for improving one’s effectiveness as an ethically competent clinical social supervisor. This session is designed for social workers who have met the earlier requirements of a 40-hour course and who now want to meet the established requirements for advanced clinical supervisor training as set forth by the Texas State Board of Social Work Examiners.

Objectives

Upon concluding this course, students will be able to:

  • Develop a framework for understanding seven key areas related to the process and practice of clinical supervision in social work.
  • Assess their strengths and limitations around these seven established areas.
  • Identify specific strategies for improving one’s effectiveness as an ethically competent clinical supervisor.

About the Instructors

Sandra A. Lopez, LCSW, DCSW is a retired clinical professor from the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work and maintains a clinical and consulting practice in Houston. She has over 34 years of social work experience and has provided supervision and consultation to numerous social workers pursuing their LCSW.

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Adult Psychopathology: DSM-5, Assessment, and Treatment

Date: Friday, April 21, 2017

Time: 9:00AM - 5:00 PM

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $100

Course: 17SSW0278C

CEUs: 7 CEUs

About the Course

The purpose of this course is to integrate knowledge of mental disorders (psychopathology) into the clinical social work practice perspective. Social workers represent the majority of mental health professionals in direct practice in the US and consequently play a critically important role in the mental health field. Social workers view psychopathology and wellness within the broader context of a client’s personal and family history, as well as her or his current social and occupational environment, important life events, stressors, and her or his strengths and resources. In order to be optimally helpful to clients, a social worker needs to know how to best organize this information and how to link it to the principles, strategies and techniques that comprise interventions with proven efficacy. Social workers should know how to utilize efficacious interventions in practice. Case formulation is the centerpiece of the course. An individualized case formulation is a tool to link assessment, treatment, and aftercare, and to link research and practice. A formulation is a way to organize and structure individual clinical information such that meaningful goals can be established and optimal intervention planned. The case formulation integrates the client’s current symptoms, impairments, and strengths, in the context of important life events and chronic stressors, family and community, and the client’s own past history.

Objectives

Upon concluding this course, students will be able to:

  • Learn the diagnostic criteria and their application for the most common adult mental disorders using DSM-5.
  • Know how to develop an individualized case formulation for adults
  • Be familiar with commonly used assessment instruments and evidencebased interventions for adults.

About the Instructors

Dr. Robin E. Gearing is an Associate Professor at the University of Houston and a Clinical Associate Professor at UT Health McGovern Medical School Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. For more than twenty years, he also has extensive experience practicing as a clinical social worker in psychosocial and mental health treatment service. Dr. Gearing’s program of research concentrates in the areas of adolescent mental health services use and treatment interventions. His research examines and seeks to build on improving and family treatment engagement, adherence, and developing evidence-based psychosocial treatment interventions for youth with mental illness and their families. In addition to other forums, findings from Dr. Gearing’s research have appeared in over 50 peer-review journal publications.

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