QUICK TAKES

UH has received a $300,000 GRANT FROM THE TEXAS WORKFORCE COMMISSION to bolster the recruitment and retention of historically underrepresented students in engineering programs. UH’s program will include peer mentoring for incoming freshmen and transfer students in engineering.

UH IS RANKED 17TH IN THE NATION FOR AWARDING BACHELOR’S AND DOCTORAL DEGREES TO HISPANIC STUDENTS, according to Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education magazine. The College of Pharmacy is ranked third — jumping from eighth place — among professional degree and academic programs. Other rankings: College of Optometry (second), Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture (third), Jack J. Valenti School of Communication (ninth) and C.T. Bauer College of Business marketing and business programs (seventh).

The COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY has earned UH a national honor. The university has been designated the National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education for
2009–14 by the National Security Agency.

Students give the C.T. BAUER COLLEGE OF BUSINESS thumbs up. Bauer is one of 15 graduate schools of business named to Princeton Review’s Student Opinion Honors for Business Schools in the General Management category, which appeared in Entrepreneur magazine.

The CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING has launched a nanoengineering minor with an emphasis on commercialization. Undergraduate students will experience in-depth training and hands-on experience with state-of-the-art equipment. With financial support from the National Science Foundation, the college will provide two-year, $3,000 scholarships this fall to 15 juniors.

STUDENT NEWS

EXPERIENCE …
REAL WORLD STYLE


Evan Leung, accounting junior, represented the C.T. Bauer College of Business at the PricewaterhouseCoopers Leadership Adventure, a two-day program where students learn how to put leadership into practice. He spent his summer in Chicago, honing his leadership skills along with 200 other student leaders from across the nation. The program seeks to complement what students learn in the classroom with real-world experience. Leung plans to put his leadership skills into practice with the Accounting Society and Delta Sigma Pi. His long-term goals include getting a master’s degree and a CPA .

TAKING IT TO THE HILL

Derek Goodwin’s research of Mary Talbert shed new light on Talbert’s role in building the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in Texas. The Honors history and political science major took his findings to Washington, D.C. His research poster abstract, “That Part of Hell Where We Should Work: Mary B. Talbert and the Texas NAACP,” was selected for “Posters on the Hill,” a Council of Undergraduate Research event showcasing students’ research to members of Congress and representatives of higher education funding agencies. Charles Orson Cook (M.S. ’72, Ph.D. ’80), faculty mentor and professor of history in The Honors College, directed Goodwin to an article on black history in Texas that mentioned Talbert.

SAY AMEN

Philip Sinitiere (Ph.D. ’09), recent history graduate, has co-authored “Holy Mavericks.” The book takes a look at five of the nation’s mega-evangelists, including Houston’s Joel Osteen and Bishop T.D. Jakes of Dallas.

Gov. Appoints Regents

UH System welcomes new board members.

UH System Regents

Gov. Rick Perry has appointed Nandita V. Berry (’91, J.D. ’95), Tilman J. Fertitta, Jarvis V. Hollingsworth (J.D. ’93) and Kristen Lindley to the UH System Board of Regents.

“With their diverse backgrounds, considerable talents and strong leadership abilities, I am confident that each of these appointees will make outstanding contributions to our board and to the University of Houston System,” says UH System Chancellor and UH President Renu Khator.

The appointments of Berry, Fertitta and Hollingsworth expire Aug. 31, 2015. They replace Calvin Stephens (’72), Dennis Golden (’76, O.D. ’77) and Lynden Rose (’83, J.D. ’89), whose board terms expired.

The 10-member Board of Regents is the governing body of the UH System, which includes UH, UH-Clear Lake, UH-Downtown and UH-Victoria as well as UH System at Sugar Land and UH System at Cinco Ranch multi-institutional teaching centers and KUHT television and KUHF radio stations.

Berry, of Houston, is senior counsel at Locke, Lord, Bissell and Liddell LLP. She received a bachelor’s degree from Mt. Carmel College in Bangalore, India, a bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston and a law degree from the UH Law Center.

Fertitta, of Houston, is chairman and CEO of Landry’s Restaurants Inc. He attended the University of Houston.

Hollingsworth, of Sugar Land, is a partner at Bracewell and Giuliani LLP. He received a bachelor’s degree from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, where he was co-captain of the Army football team, and his law degree from UH.

Earlier this year, Kristen Lindley was appointed as the student regent for a one-year term expiring May 31, 2010. Lindley graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor’s degree from UH-Victoria and has entered UHV’s M.B.A. program this fall. She is the first UHV student to be named to the board.

Creation of the Ship Channel Security District

UH forges intricate partnership.

Pat BellamyThe development of the Houston Ship Channel Security District, a public-private partnership that will fund enhancements to technology, infrastructure and processes along the ship channel, was done in large part by Pat Bellamy (’76), chairman of the Houston Ship Channel Security Council and director of UH’s Southwest Public Safety Technology Center.

Bellamy insists that “UH enabled a can-do mindset and provided a neutral environment in which issues were discussed openly and resolved.”

SWTC, which is dedicated to research and education in the area of public safety technology and homeland security, entered into an agreement with the county and port authority to plan, develop, design, construct and implement security projects, says center executive director and engineering professor Steven Pei.

Local officials, including U.S. Rep. Gene Green (’71) and County Judge Ed Emmett, note the instrumental role UH played in creating a security apparatus that also will protect residents and workers, deter theft and mitigate man-made and natural disasters.

“In an area such as the security of the Port of Houston, there can be no weak link in the chain. Every facility must cooperate and contribute to harden the port from terrorists,” says U.S. Coast Guard Capt. Bill Diehl, adding that Bellamy married “the intellectual knowledge of the University of Houston with the industrial might of the facilities along the ship channel to make a security ring of steel.”

 

Designer Lenses

Patients in study get customized contacts.

The development of the Houston Ship Channel Security District, a public-private partnership that will fund enhancements to technology, infrastructure and processes along the ship channel, was done in large part by Pat Bellamy (’76), chairman of the Houston Ship Channel Security Council and director of UH’s Southwest Public Safety Technology Center.

Bellamy insists that “UH enabled a can-do mindset and provided a neutral environment in which issues were discussed openly and resolved.”

SWTC, which is dedicated to research and education in the area of public safety technology and homeland security, entered into an agreement with the county and port authority to plan, develop, design, construct and implement security projects, says center executive director and engineering professor Steven Pei.

Local officials, including U.S. Rep. Gene Green (’71) and County Judge Ed Emmett, note the instrumental role UH played in creating a security apparatus that also will protect residents and workers, deter theft and mitigate man-made and natural disasters.

“In an area such as the security of the Port of Houston, there can be no weak link in the chain. Every facility must cooperate and contribute to harden the port from terrorists,” says U.S. Coast Guard Capt. Bill Diehl, adding that Bellamy married “the intellectual knowledge of the University of Houston with the industrial might of the facilities along the ship channel to make a security ring of steel.”

Every Move You Make

Free iPhone app helps burn calories.

What can’t the iPhone do? Thanks to a UH computer science professor, it can count the calories burned through the Walk n’ Play download. Available from Apple’s App Store, users can have fun while burning calories. The game allows players to keep track of their physical activity through their iPhones.


“You attach the phone to your waistband or carry it in your pocket, and it records every motion — from walking to climbing stairs — and translates it into calories burned,”


iPhone
Designed by a team of researchers led by Ioannis Pavlidis, Eckerd Pfeiffer Professor, the application’s co-developers include postdoctoral researcher Pradeep Buddharaju (M.S. ’05, Ph.D. ’07) and doctoral student Yuichi Fujiki.

“You attach the phone to your waistband or carry it in your pocket, and it records every motion — from walking to climbing stairs — and translates it into calories burned,” Pavlidis says. “The game tallies everything daily.”

A defining characteristic is the competition aspect. Users can employ the buddy system with a friend who also carries an iPhone or challenge themselves with a simulator programmed to follow an ideal routine for maintaining or losing weight through healthy activities.

While similar devices, like pedometers, are not new, this iPhone application is unique. Pedometers communicate measurements with steps. Calories, however, are metabolic units and the best measure of physical activity. But, people don’t sweat through everyday tasks anymore. Walk n’ Play allows the user to treat the world as a treadmill, giving a more accurate calorie count.

“Modern conveniences have changed our way of life,” says Pavlidis. “The basic idea behind the application we’ve developed is for people to get motivated and back to living more active lifestyles.”