Research Associates

Jessica Brown

Jessica Brown
Interim Director, Center for Immigration Research
Assistant Professor of Sociology
University of Houston
484 Philip G. Hoffman Hall
(713)743-3958
jabrown8@central.uh.edu

Jessica Brown is the Interim Director of the Center for Immigration Research, and Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Houston. Professor Brown conducts qualitative research in the areas of immigration, transnational sociology, gender, and race and ethnicity. Her dissertation examined the process of citizenship education for immigrants in the German city of Frankfurt am Main with a focus on how certain normative ideologies, emotions, and micro-level practices are used to draw the line between citizen and “outsider.” Her earlier work looked at British print media coverage of falling fertility levels in the UK and Europe and analyzed pronatalist appeals aimed at convincing native-born (white) women to increase their fertility so as to forestall the need for replacement migration.

 

Amanda Baumle

Amanda K. Baumle
Associate Professor of Sociology
University of Houston
(713) 743-3944
akbaumle@uh.edu

Dr. Amanda K. Baumle, J.D., Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Houston. She specializes in the fields of demography and law and society, and has published books and articles in these areas. She is the coauthor of Same-Sex Partners: The Demography of Sexual Orientation, the author of Sex Discrimination and Law Firm Culture on the Internet: Lawyers at the Information Age Water Cooler, and the editor of Demography in Transition: Emerging Trends in Population Study. Her current research includes examining immigrants' use of rights discourse during the 2006 immigrant protests, as well as the availability and use of legal services by migrants.

 

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Anne Chandler
Acting Director of the UH Immigration Clinic
University of Houston
(713) 713-2094
achandler@central.uh.edu

Anne Chandler is the Acting Director of the University of Houston Law Center’s Immigration Clinic. She is a 1998 cum laude graduate of the University of Houston Law Center where she served on the Houston Law Review, received a Distinguished Service Award, won the Joan Glantz Garfinkel Scholarship for civil liberties research, and served as President of the Public Interest Law Organization, focusing on provision of services to aliens detained in Harlingen, Texas. She received her bachelor’s degree magna cum laude in 1994 from Colorado State University where she majored in political science, receiving a certificate in Latin American studies and writing her thesis on U.S.-Mexico labor relations. She serves as a Board of Trustee of the American Immigration Law Foundation and a mentor attorney in the area of asylum and refugee law for the American Immigration Law Association.

 

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Jeronimo Cortina
Assistant Professor of Political Science
University of Houston
(713) 743-3894
jcortina@central.uh.edu

Dr. Jeronimo Cortina is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and a Research Fellow at the Center for Public Policy at the University of Houston. He earned a PhD in Political Science from Columbia University where he previously earned a Master of Philosophy and a Master's degree in public Administration and Public Policy from the School of International and Public Affairs. Currently Mr. Cortina is conducting research on the impact of international migration on children left-behind. In collaboration with the Special Unit for South-South Cooperation of UNDP and UNICEF Mr. Cortina coordinated the implementation of pilot surveys on the impact of migration on the left-behind in Ecuador and Albania in order to formulate a common methodology for gathering reliable data that captures both the positive and negative effects of migration on children left-behind. He is also serving as a co-chair of the Migration Program at the Initiative for Policy Dialogue (www.policydialogue.org) headed by Nobel laureate economist Joseph Stiglitz and Jose Antonio Ocampo. Most of his work is publicly available through his webpage at: www.jeronimocortina.com

 

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Mary Ann Davis
Assistant Professor of Sociology
Sam Houston State University
(936) 294-4083
mad011@shsu.edu

Dr. Mary Ann Davis is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Same Houston State University. Dr. Davis specializes in social demography and gender. Her current research includes an examination of intercountry adoptions of children as a form of migration, using DHS data, focusing on a “fifth wave” of intercountry adoptees from Africa. In addition, she is interested in examining gendered migration, including the migration of females to provide domestic/reproductive service occupational needs, focusing on the stream from Ecuador to Spain.

 

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A. Gary Dworkin
Professor of Sociology
Co-Director of The Sociology of Education Research Group
University of Houston
(713)743-3955
gdworkin@uh.edu

Dr. A.Gary Dworkin, professor, University of Houston, is co-founder of the Sociology of Education Research Group (SERG). He is currently Secretary of Research Committee 04 (Sociology of Education) of the International Sociological Association. He has served on the Council of the Sociology of Education section of the American Sociological Association, as President of the Southwestern Sociological Association, and was program chair of the RC04 sessions on educational accountability, standards, and testing for the September 2008 First ISA Forum of Sociology, Barcelona, September 2008. His publications include ten books and numerous articles on teacher burnout and student dropout behavior, minority-majority relations and gender roles, and the assessment of school accountability systems. Recently, Dr. Dworkin published a commissioned article for the Southern Education Foundation’s 2008 Latino-Black Education Initiative, entitled “Dropping out of high school: Another American dilemma.” Dworkin and Lawrence J. Saha are co-editors of The New International Handbook on Research on Teachers and Teaching (Springer Publishers, 2009). He published essays on accountability and high-stakes testing under No Child Left Behind in the journal Sociology of Education (2005) and in Sadovnik et al., No Child Left Behind and the Reduction of the Achievement Gap: Sociological Perspectives on Federal Education Policy (Routledge 2007). SERG has served as an outsourced research department for school districts that otherwise could not afford research. It currently maintains computerized student record and test score data on every child who attended a Texas public school between 1994 and 2008. These data have permitted SERG to assess the academic performances of immigrant students with Limited English Proficiency for school districts to assess whether their academic placements were successful in promoting a transition to English fluency.

 

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Helen Rose Ebaugh
Professor of Sociology
University of Houston
(713) 743-3952
ebaugh@uh.edu

Dr. Helen Rose Ebaugh received her Ph.D. in Sociology from Columbia University in 1975 with specialties in organizational Sociology and the Sociology of Religion. In addition to five books, she has published numerous articles in scholarly journals, including The American Sociological Review, Social Forces, the Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Sociological Analysis and The Journal For The Scientific Study of Religion.

She served as president of the national Association for the Sociology of Religion, helped organize and served as the first chair of the American Sociological Association’s Section on the Sociology of Religion and is past president of the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion. Dr. Ebaugh received two consecutive research grants from the Pew Charitable Trusts to study religion and the new immigrants in the United States. The results from the first grant that focused on the role of religious congregations in the incorporation of new immigrants is described in Religion and the New Immigrants: Adaptations and Continuities in New Immigrant Congrations (AltaMira Press, 2000). The second book from the project, Religion Across Borders: Transnational Religious Networks (AltaMira Press,s 2002) is an analysis of the impact of religious ties among immigrants in the United States and family/friends in their home countries. Her latest research appears in Religion and the New Immigrants (2000) and Religion Across Borders (2002), both with Alta Mira Press. She is currently writing a book on the Gulen Movement, a Turkish Islamic movement that is now transnational, involving Turkish immigrants in the diaspora.

 

Elaine Ecklund

Elaine Howard Ecklund
Assistant Professor of Sociology
Associate Director of Center on Race, Religion and Urban Life (CORRUL)
Rice University
(713) 348-6761
ehe@rice.edu

Dr. Elaine Howard Ecklund is assistant professor of sociology and Associate Director for the Center on Race, Religion, and Urban Life (CORRUL) at Rice University. Here research centers on understanding how new Americans will adapt to and even influence institutional spheres of American life.  The following questions are of pressing concern:  How do different ethnic groups of new immigrants and their children compare to other groups of Americans in the frameworks they develop for ethnic identities, political commitments, and forms of faith? How do first and second-generation immigrants compare to one another along these dimensions?  Answers to such questions and others will bring broader understanding of how new immigrants compare to earlier waves of immigrants and to the native-born and provide broader insight for the potential of new Americans to change US civic institutions.

 

Michael Emerson

Michael Emerson
Professor of Sociology
Director of Center on Race, Religion, Urban Life (CORRUL)
Rice University
(713) 348-4448
moe@rice.edu

Dr. Michael O. Emerson is the Allyn and Gladys Cline Professor of Sociology and Founding Director of the Center on Race, Religion, and Urban Life at Rice University.  Currently, he is studying the role of immigrants' religion on their engagement with U.S. civic life, and the role of migration and immigration on the growth of coastal cities in the China and the United States.

 

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Tracy Xavia Karner
Associate Professor of Sociology
Director of Visual Studies
University of Houston
(713)743-3961
txkarner@uh.edu

Dr. Tracy Xavia Karner 's primary research interests concern the social construction and transformation of self and identity. She has explored these processes on many levels (individual, subcultures, organizations, and communities) and in a variety of contexts (hospitals, community service agencies, nationalist movements, mass media). For over ten years she oversaw the evaluation component of an AOA national demonstration that was focused on developing and implementing new service models in immigrant, ethnic minority, and rural communities