M.A. Non-Thesis Track

Timetable

For full time students, the recommended timetable for this thirty-six (36) hour degree is as follows:

First Semester, 9 hours.

In addition to taking 9 hours decided in consultation with a faculty advisor, students should:

  • Decide on a minor field.

Second Semester, 9 hours.

Regardless of how students arrange their courses in their first two semesters, all students will be expected to complete a research seminar, at least one historiography course, at least one major field course, and at least one minor field course by the end of their first year.  The remaining two courses will be chosen according to students’ individual program requirements and the available course offerings.

Third Semester, 9 hours.

Fourth Semester, 9 hours.

In addition to taking 9 hours decided in consultation with a faculty advisor, students must successfully complete their oral examination for the M.A. degree.

Regardless of how students arrange their courses in their first two years, we expect all students by the end of their second year to complete all coursework and pass an oral examination on their coursework.

Major area

Before the beginning of the second semester of graduate work, the student must indicate a major area of study from one of the following: United States, European, Latin American, or Transnational history.  Students will also be expected to develop through at least six (6) hours of course work knowledge of the history and interpretations of one field in their major area, selected from the following list:

Europe

  • Hellenistic History, 330-30 B.C.
  • Early Middle Ages
  • High Middle Ages
  • Late Middle Ages
  • English Legal and Constitutional
  • Early Modern England
  • Early Modern European Intellectual History
  • Ancient Regime and Revolutionary France
  • Modern Britain & Empire
  • 19th Century Europe
  • Modern Germany
  • Modern France
  • Modern European Social and Women’s History
  • Modern European Intellectual

Latin America

  • Latin America to 1825
  • Latin America since 1825

United States

  • United States to 1877
  • United States since 1877

Transnational History

Specific field definitions for M.A. work in Transnational history will be determined in consultation with the prospective thesis committee, subject to approval by the Director of Graduate Studies.  Examples of what might be attempted in this field include America and the world; the Atlantic World; comparative history involving study of two or more countries, regions, or continents; energy and the environment; gender; immigration history; international relations; the Pacific Rim; and race and ethnicity.  Students may base their Transnational work in any of the regions where the department has faculty resources:  Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, or the United States.

For a complete description of all program requirements and policies, please downlaod a pdf of the Graduate Student Handbook. The mterial on this website constitutes a brief introduction to the program and a full description of the application process.