CBPR WORKSHOP

2010 Community-Based Participatory Research Workshop

"Reducing Barriers between Researchers & Communities"

Thursday, April 8 and Friday, April 9 ▪ University of Houston

The 3rd Annual JERHRE Workshop is scheduled for October 25- 28, 2011. Read Details and Register to Attend.

Program Schedule

Thursday, April 8, 2010
Farish Hall, Kiva Room 101 (Click here for map*)

*Parking is at the UH Welcome Center Garage. Attendees should ask for a parking validation at the Workshop check-in table.

*Magnolia Houston Hotel guests should view the transportation schedule for the shuttle from the hotel to the workshop and back.

8:00am-10:00am

Check-in and late registrations (all name badges will be held at the check-in table outside the classroom)

8:00am-10:00am

Continental Breakfast

9:00am

Welcome to the Workshop (Joan Sieber, JERHRE; Jim Granato, CPP and Sarena Seifer, CCPH).

9:10am

Keynote: “The Many Approaches to CBPR: Learning from the differences” (Linda Silka, University of Maine)

Q & A, and Discussion

10:00am

Keynote: "Dissolving Boundaries in CBPR: Technology, Partnerships and National Models" (James O'Leary, Genetic Alliance)

Q & A, and Discussion

10:50am

Break

11:00am

New technologies that can create and manage communities

  1. Online communities and their potential as research collaborators (Emily Anderson, University of Illinois).
  2. Geospatial technology applications in CBPR (David Padgett, Tennessee State University).
  3. Commentary: The potential impacts of new e-technologies on CBPR and medicine (Jerome Crowder, University of Houston).

Panel and audience Q & A, and discussion after each presentation.

12:00pm

Lunch in Discussion Groups

12:45pm

Understanding the nature of CBPR, the risks involved, and how to make it safe and equitable for communities and their members

  1. Introducing NIH clinical & translational science program - moving laboratory & clinical research results into the community (Andrea Sawczuk, NIH).
  2. How to establish and maintain effective research partnerships at each stage of the relationship (Lainie Ross, University of Chicago).2
  3. Understanding risk in CBPR from the perspective of individual community members and the community as an organization (Lainie Ross, University of Chicago).
  4. The roles required to extend human subjects protections to a community (Greg Koski, Harvard Medical School).
  5. Commentary and moderated discussion: Greg Koski, Moderator. Panel and audience Q & A, and discussion after each presentation.

3:00pm Reception (Hallway of Kiva Room)

FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010

Melcher Hall, Room 170 (Click here for map*)

*Parking is at the UH Welcome Center Garage. Attendees should ask for a parking validation at the Workshop check-in table.

*Magnolia Houston Hotel guests should view the transportation schedule for the shuttle from the hotel to the workshop and back.

8:00am-10:00am

Check-in and late registrations (all name badges will be held at the check-in desk outside the classroom)

8:00am-10:00am

Continental Breakfast

9:00am

Greeting. Where we have been and where we are going.

9:10am Recognizing and resolving individual value and cultural issues

  1. What seems ethical and culturally sensitive in one context may not work in another (Ilana Reisz, Public Health Consultant).
  2. Learning from experience (Jean Kegler, Epiphany Community Health Outreach Services).
  3. Working with linguistically isolated communities (Vishnu Nepal & Deborah Banerjee, Houston Department of Health and Human Services).
  4. Shared ownership of CBPR: The importance of person and place (Peter de Schweinitz, University of Utah).
  5. Commentary: Norma Olvera, University of Houston Panel and audience Q & A, and discussion after each presentation.

11:00am

Break

11:15am Gatekeepers of Community Research and Development

  1. Community-Led CBPR: Redefining roles in research (James O’Leary, Genetic Alliance).
  2. Communities that establish their own research review (Sarena Seifer, Community-Campus Partnerships for Health).
  3. Urban communities that have developed their own gate-keeping and ethics standards (Linda Silka, University of Maine).
  4. Designing human subjects protection training for community partners engaged in research: Challenges and Lessons (Stephanie Solomon and Tricia Piechowski, University of Michigan).
  5. Commentary (Emily Anderson, University of Illinois). Panel and audience Q & A, and discussion after each presentation.

1:00pm

Lunch in Discussion Groups

1:30pm Obtaining and sustaining funding and services

  1. NIH criteria and preferences for funding academic and community groups (Dana Sampson, NIH).
  2. b. Creation, development and sustaining of community faculty at charities (Marlynn May, Texas A&M, & Celene Mayer, St. Luke's Episcopal Health Charities).
  3. Using VISTAs for sustainable CBPR initiatives (Karen Hahn, Center for Faith and Health Initiatives)
  4. Accessing federal and state funds for faith-based and community organizations through establishment of local coalitions (Robert Ford, Texas Southern University).
  5. Commentary (Andrea Sawczuk, NIH). Panel and audience Q & A, and discussion after each presentation

3:00pm Integration

Each topic of this workshop deals with ways of reducing barriers. As a final integration, a final panel will seek to identify gaps and lead a discussion of what topics to focus on at the next workshop in 2011. (Moderator: Linda Silka, University of Maine & Joan Sieber, Editor, JERHRE).

3:30pm

Transportation to Bush Intercontinental Airport.

[2} A project designed to provide guidelines to community researchers was funded by the National Center for Research Resources, National Institutes of Health, through the Clinical and Translational Science Awards Program, part of the Roadmap initiative, Re-Engineering the Clinical Research Enterprise. Three papers were completed and approved by the approved by the CTSA Consortium Publications Committee and are presented here. The authors are: Lainie Friedman Ross (University of Chicago), Allan Loup (Washington University School of Law), Robert M. Nelson (U. S. Food and Drug Administration), Jeffrey R. Botkin (University of Utah), Rhonda Kost (Rockefeller University), George R Smith, Jr. (Healthcare Consortium of Illinois), and Sarah Gehlert (Washington University). They were advised by 25 consultants.